Research Program Assistant II

first_img Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine -East Baltimore Campus The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfm Facebook Research Program Assistant II Save Research Program Assistant II LinkedIn GeneralSummary/Purpose:This candidate would be responsible for coordinating multipleresearch studies. One of the primary studies is a multi-centercollaborative project aimed at decreasing the rate of acute kidneyinjury (AKI) in hospitalized children, which will be overseen byDr. Jeff Fadrowski. Another major study is aimed at improvingoutcomes in children who have received kidney transplants. Thisproject is overseen by Dr. Alicia Neu. In addition there aremultiple other active research studies including industry-sponsoredpharmaceutical trials for which the research assistant may beresponsible. The research assistant must be capable of balancingmultiple tasks at once, acting independently, and performingproactively.The successful candidate will work in close collaboration withthe Division’s Senior Research Program Coordinator,faculty/principal investigators, fellows, and staff. We are acollegial division where personal and professional development isencouraged in an environment of mutualrespect.Specific Duties &Responsibilities:Screening and enrollment of studyparticipantsIRBapplications as well as changes in research and continuingreviewsPrimary collection of study data, data entry , and databasemanagementAssisting faculty with study development including creation ofdata collection tools and promotionalmaterialsOpportunities for data analysis and contribution to scholarlyproductsOccasional facilitation of study visits and ensuring that studyprocedures are done in accordance with the study protocol andethical guidelinesCommunication with study participants to schedule study visitsand promote study retentionWorking with internal and external study monitors to ensure thatproper documentation of all study procedures and administrativerequirementsMinimum Qualifications(mandatory):Highschool diploma/GEDrequired.2years relatedexperience.Additional education may substitute for required experience, tothe extent permitted by the JHU equivalencyformula.JHUEquivalency Formula: 30undergraduate degree credits (semester hours) or 18 graduate degreecredits may substitute for one year of experience. For jobs whereequivalency is permitted, up to two years of non-related collegecourse work may be applied towards the total minimumeducation/experience required for the respectivejob.PreferredQualifications:Bachelor’s degree in related discipline stronglypreferred.Oneyear prior experience working in clinical research ispreferred.Special Knowledge, Skills, andAbilities:Excellent computer skills andorganizational skills a must as well as attention todetail.Knowledge of software, includingMicrosoft Word and Excel isneeded.Requires outstanding verbalcommunication and interpersonal skills with participants, PrincipalInvestigators, and other teammembers.Interest in working with mentallyill/disadvantaged populationsneeded.Knowledge of software, includingMicrosoft Word and Excel isneeded.Mustbe highly motivated, organized, personable, willing to learn,responsible, reliable, andefficient.Mustbe comfortable working with patientpopulations.Classified Title:Research Program AssistantIIWorking Title: Research ProgramAssistant IIRole/Level/Range: ACRO40/E/02/CC Starting Salary Range:$14.14-$19.44 per hour;commensurate with experienceEmployee group: Full Time Schedule: Monday-Friday/8:00am-5:00pm Exempt Status: Non-ExemptLocation: 04-MD:School of Medicine Campus Department name: 10003086-SOM Ped Nephrology Personnel area: Johns Hopkins UniversityThe successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject toa pre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply dependingon which campus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www.eeoc.gov/sites/default/files/migrated_files/employers/poster_screen_reader_optimized.pdf Twitter Academic Affairs Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Save Research Program Assistant II More searches like this Administrative Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore You need to sign in or create an account to save Apply(This will open in a new window from which you will be automatically redirected to an external site after 5 seconds) Johns Hopkins University Research Program Assistant II Salary Not Specified Maryland, United States Save Research Program Assistant II Research Administration Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Maryland, United States Maryland, United States Salary Not Specified Similar jobs Johns Hopkins University You need to sign in or create an account to save Research Program Assistant II Salary Not Specified You need to sign in or create an account to save Sharelast_img read more

US sells Hong Kong consulate apartments at big discount: $7K psf

first_imgThe apartment complex (CBRE)The U.S. government has agreed to sell a compound in a prime Hong Kong neighborhood to local developer Hang Lung Properties for $332 million.The 26-unit property served as residences for local consulate staff. Hang Lung Properties plans to redevelop it with luxury detached houses, according to the Wall Street Journal.The complex totals 95,000 square feet and the sale price is considered a major discount for the area. Prices for Hong Kong properties across sectors have been trending downward over the last year as a result of sustained civil unrest in the territory and the coronavirus pandemic.With the property offering 47,400 square feet of floor area available for redevelopment, the sale price comes out to around $7,000 per square foot. That’s more than a third less than what developer China Resources Land paid per square foot for a comparable, neighboring property in 2018.News broke in June that the property was on the market. At the time, the U.S. State Department said the sale was part of a wider reinvestment push.A State Department spokesperson said the sale “will not affect our presence, staffing, or operations in any way,” according to the Journal. Some of the proceeds from the sale will be reinvested into other U.S.-owned properties in Hong Kong.The U.S. and China have clashed over the latter’s increased political involvement in the historically independent territory.The sale is expected to close by the end of the year. Hang Lung said that in total the firm would invest about $516 million into the property, including the cost of acquisition. It hopes to complete the redevelopment by 2024. [WSJ] — Dennis Lynch  This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Nowlast_img read more

Reflecting on the Evolution of Retail Security

first_imgEDITOR’S NOTE: Paul Jones, LPC, is the new director of asset protection and risk management at CKE Restaurants Holdings, Inc. The 25-year retail veteran started his career at Jordan Marsh and Mervyns before moving into management roles at Luxottica Retail, Sunglass Hut, and Limited Brands where he was senior vice president of LP and global security. Jones also led the loss prevention functions at the Retail Industry Leaders Association as well as at eBay. Most recently he was COO for Turning Point Justice before moving to CKE. Jones has long been active in the industry as an original member of the LP Magazine editorial board and founding member of the Loss Prevention Foundation.EDITOR: You recently took a position with CKE Restaurants. Tell us who CKE is and what brands they represent.JONES: CKE Restaurants Holdings, Inc. owns two brands in the quick-service restaurant (QSR) industry, Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s. We are headquartered in Franklin, Tennessee, just outside Nashville with more than 3,900 restaurant locations in 42 states and in 28 countries.- Sponsor – EDITOR: Didn’t CKE start in Southern California?JONES: That’s correct. CKE’s founder, Carl Karcher, began his entrepreneurial venture in Los Angeles in 1941 with hot dog stands and quickly grew the business. By 1945, the Karcher family had opened the first Carl’s Jr. restaurant in Anaheim. The restaurants steadily spread throughout the West Coast in the post-World War II growth of the American highway system. A couple of years ago, the company made a strategic decision to move the California corporate offices in Anaheim and Carpinteria along with the St. Louis, Missouri, office to Tennessee.EDITOR: Carl’s Jr. is predominately still on the West Coast, correct?JONES: In the United States, Hardee’s restaurants are predominately east of the Mississippi and Carl’s Jr. on the west, but the brand recognition for the Happy Star is nationwide. Both Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s pride themselves on providing great customer service and innovative menu options while still maintaining their charbroiled burger roots.EDITOR: You were most recently the COO of an LP industry solution provider. What enticed you to make the move back to the retail side with CKE?JONES: Well, a couple things. First and foremost, my heart is in retail loss prevention and always has been. While I had great learnings as a solution provider and have newfound respect and admiration for those in the solution-provider space, I had a desire to get back into retail. As I worked with my network, the opportunity at CKE was presented to me as a group that was looking to change and transform their company. They were looking for a leader of asset protection and risk management that could help them with that transformation.I had the pleasure of interviewing with our chief operating officer, Tom Brennan, and we really clicked. I was very excited about the type of change the whole executive leadership team at CKE envisioned. It reminded me of my early Sunglass Hut days when I was part of that company’s dramatic change. Today that company is still a vibrant, successful retailer as part of Luxottica Group. The CKE Leadership Team is committed to driving our global business forward, running a great QSR business, and having a global footprint to make this a very profitable company.EDITOR: What areas of responsibility do you have?JONES: Today I have asset protection, safety, and risk management. The QSR world is a little different from regular retail. Safety in our world is not only reviewing accidents to get to the root cause and figuring out solutions but also actually getting into the pipeline of how we build our restaurants, the type of equipment we use, developing new equipment when what’s out there isn’t working, and creating processes that will further enhance our safety culture.Then we have a compliance function behind that, so as new products or solutions are introduced, we train and educate our employees to ensure they are working safely. In the QSR space, safety issues can be a bigger hit to the P&L than actual shrink loss.EDITOR: Thus far, what have you found to be the major challenges and issues?JONES: Currently, we have a unique challenge because we have an existing team running the business that’s in place in California that we’re replacing. So we almost have two jobs: one to develop a new team, new protocols, and new methods and procedures to attack losses and safety and risk, but at the same time managing the existing team. It’s pretty unique to some of the transformations that I’ve done in the past.If you think about it, it takes a certain type of care and motivation for those associates who need to continue to drive the business forward while knowing that they are transitioning out of the company. But I’ve got to tell you, the team that we have in place in Anaheim has really stepped up to the challenge. They’ve been ultimate professionals in helping us build a new team in Franklin and making sure that they hold the business together with true integrity and honor in order to leave us with a better process and a better team.EDITOR: Are you currently hiring your own team?JONES: That’s my second-biggest focus. How do you hire a team of ten in a period of sixty days and get them trained within ninety days while not missing a beat with your current business? We’re in that process now of recruiting talent. Incidentally, I was able to find all our asset protection people using LPjobs.com.It’s been really rewarding to take a new group of people—some with QSR experience, some with none—and onboard them very quickly knowing that we’re in this challenge learning the QSR space, because it is a different space.EDITOR: Is your team going to be situated across the company in regional locations?JONES: No, we went to a centralized model as I have done in past companies. When I started looking at the challenges and what the future looks like, it made sense to centralize the team and fly them out when we need them in the field. We’re moving to a telephone-interviewing model and high-prevention model—how we prevent incidents so that we’re not taking cases but really mining the data to go after only ones that are most meaningful. We’ve spent the last ninety days putting all the data sets together so that we fully understand all the drivers and triggers of profit loss, risk loss, and accident causes throughout the business.EDITOR: Explain that a bit more.JONES: We’ve done a ton of work to make sure that we understand the historical data to allow us to plan for the future. Part of the plan on the asset protection side is speaking to the field team in a way that they really understand what their losses are because today they don’t fully understand that. What we’ve done is come up with simple risk models—one, two, three, four, five—and input into risk models their food loss, accident cost, coupons, voids, and cash loss. What we see, as we all know the 80/20 rule, we can focus the field team on where we need better training, where we could maybe use more staffing, and where we could use investigations. In the past, they didn’t have the ability or the tools to be data-centric, whereas today we’re building those metrics so that we can move forward.EDITOR: Talk about some of the technology solutions that you already have or that you plan to implement.JONES: We’ve done just basic data mining using some internal tools, taking all the disparate databases in the company from audit scores to past cases to food loss to voids to chargebacks to turnover rates and building risk models with that. In the past, CKE looked at those things separately, but as we know as practitioners, we gain a lot more insights putting them together and looking at that total picture.We found it necessary to break out Carl’s Jr. as a separate entity from Hardee’s when doing that type of data analysis because the shrink problems, food loss problems, safety problems are different in both locations. There are drivers, for instance, on food loss in a Hardee’s environment that’s being driven by certain products, mainly biscuits and the way we do buns. In the Carl’s Jr. environment, it’s not as centric for breakfast, so there’s less food loss as it relates to those items.EDITOR: Risk management is not always an area most LP executives manage directly. How have you handled that responsibility?JONES: One of the reasons this job was very appealing to me is I’ve never managed the risk management function. I’ve managed safety but not risk. So I was excited to be able to learn a new discipline. I had several industry friends help me prepare for that. Leo Anguiano spent several days with me talking about how to think about risk. Maurice Edwards spent time with me discussing risk and total cost of risk. I appreciate that people were very generous with their time.Also, internally we recruited a solid risk management professional, and over the last four months I’ve spent a lot of time digging into understanding risk, the cost of risk, how to manage risk, how to do things maybe differently. We’ve found that we can use some technology solves into our risk pipeline to reduce costs. For one, we’re implementing a traveler care nurse line with Travelers Insurance. So instead of filling out forms and having an adjustor call our injured employees, crew members will be able to get on the phone with a nurse the minute an accident happens. Companies that use this approach find a reduction of 20 to 30 percent in their cost.Calling other people in the QSR space, asking what they’re doing, and then looking at our approach and adjusting it, I’ve found to be pretty exciting because there’s some simple fixes that we’re doing that should save us hundreds of thousands of dollars.EDITOR: Over the next twelve to eighteen months, how will you measure your success?JONES: I think from the asset protection side, it will be, has this smaller team performed at the level of the past team or above? Have we reduced losses to the company? Have we been true business partners, and have we helped the field organization make their restaurants more profitable?On the risk management side, it will be, what is the cost of risk and have we reduced it? A lot of that will be helped by our broker, Marsh, who has several QSR restaurants in their portfolio, who can help us answer, what is the total cost of an accident for worker’s comp and slips, trips, and falls? And are we at or above that? We’re starting to put quarterly measurements into place now to try to find that out because we haven’t done that historically here. Our quarterly metrics will tell us, for this same store subset, are we better or worse per total cost, per accidents per 100,000 employees, and how long has a claim stayed open? We are very aggressively working with our provider to go after the claims reviews and making decisions quickly on whether we settle or whether we move forward and litigate the claim.Again, these are new learnings for me. I’ve got to say there are at least a half dozen QSR peers that have taken my calls and helped educate me on their programs. I’m taking the nuggets I get from each of them and working them into the program that we have.EDITOR: Are more of the issues employee claims as opposed to customer claims?JONES: The biggest loss issues in the QSR risk space are employee claims. Those accidents tend to be the more egregious accidents. But slips, trips, and falls in QSR can also be a nightmare. So we’re working on a lot of things. What are best methods for keeping floors clean and keeping them from being wet? Do we have the right mops in place? Do we have the right signage in place? Are we using the right utensils in the back? Are we cleaning our fryers the right way? Do we have the personal protection equipment on? Are people wearing the right shoes? All that is audited by a third party for us, and our safety manager follows up with stores with low scores to make sure they are retrained.EDITOR: What role are you playing today with the franchisees?JONES: Today we’re a support role only. When they call and need something, we help them. The goal is as soon as our program is fully up and running, we will look at an approach for supporting our franchisees to help them be the most profitable they can be. I envision determining what are the best methods and sharing what we do. We certainly don’t tell franchisees how to run their business, but we can give them our best practices.Secondly, we have to establish a dialogue with the franchisees, which has not been part of our historic process. For example, I speak almost weekly with Tracey French at Boddie-Noell, one of our largest Hardee’s franchisees, to both learn what he’s dealing with and exchange different ideas that we’re considering. There are areas that we can collaborate and vendors that have more experience in the QSR environment.For instance, both Boddie-Noell and CKE just put in Vector Security. To us it’s a great solution, it’s the right price, and they totally understand this type of business. We both separately, without actually knowing it, have implemented ThinkLP. For us, ThinkLP will be a loss prevention portal that will handle risk management, safety, asset protection, crisis management, and will help us follow up with the field compliance piece. It will handle accident reporting and risk management paperwork, and we’re considering setting up a module that will help handle HR and maybe even legal.EDITOR: So over the next year or so, a whole lot of things will likely change in terms of your relations with the franchises.JONES: That’s right. Again, my boss, the COO Tom Brennan, his sole goal is to ensure that his team, including us, are finding ways to help the restaurants and the franchisees be more profitable. So if I take that as my headline, I have got to build a path to help us get there. And again, it’s a different relationship because you can’t force your ideas on them, but you certainly can say, “Here’s what’s worked for us and for others, and here are solution providers that we can recommend and stand behind that you might want to think about.” We think there are a number of things that we can do to help franchisees around the globe be more profitable.EDITOR: I’m confident you will make that happen, Paul. Let’s turn to some of your other unique roles in the industry. You had a great run with eBay. Tell us about that.JONES: What a great experience eBay was for me. When I was leaving RILA (the Retail Industry Leaders Association) and looking to get back into the industry, eBay offered me the opportunity to talk to them. I was a little suspicious because I knew that their site had stolen goods and believed at that time that they seemed to be resistant to taking care of that. But as I talked to them and met with individuals there, it became clear to me that the entire eBay retail problem centered around a lack of trust and communication. I looked the folks at eBay in the eyes and believed that they really, truly wanted to fix the problem. So I joined knowing that there was nowhere to go but up with the relationship. I started with just one focus-to try to bring eBay and retailers together. So in a quick period of time, I was able to show key people in eBay that there were stolen goods on the site and that we could use data to try to pinpoint that.EDITOR: How did you do that?JONES: One of my first hires was a programmer. I asked him to get me all the pawnshops on eBay who were selling baby formula, Crest Whitestrips, and diabetic test strips. There were hundreds of them on eBay. And from that point on we were able to drill into it to find out that they didn’t have a clear supply chain, that they were actually buying product from people committing crimes, and we were starting to address some of those sellers on our site. That gained instant credibility with the senior team at eBay, and I became very trustful that eBay wanted to fix those problems.As I went around the world getting onboarded with eBay, I found out that we had something like sixty people who manually processed subpoenas. It seemed very odd to me that we were doing this manually through faxes given eBay was one of the largest technology companies in the world. So we came up with an approach to automate the process, so law enforcement would go through the web to give us their subpoenas. We would pull the data automatically. We built a system that does this, which works very well today in multiple languages.We took the payroll that we saved from that and hired asset protection managers. We started looking at not only stolen goods but also counterfeiting, exploitation of children, and money laundering on the PayPal side. We built reporting and mechanisms to not only identify those crimes but also actually go after some of those criminals. From forgeries in art and autographs to clearly stolen goods to someone scamming the system by buying stuff but not paying for it, we had different approaches across the globe for all of that.We made a real dent in crime, and within a couple years, as you guys highlighted in the magazine, instead of pointing fingers, retailers and eBay were working together to solve the problems as a joint collaborative team. I’m hearing that they’re still doing great things with the retailers, which is really good.EDITOR: After eBay, you moved to the solution-provider world as COO of Turning Point Justice. What did you learn from that experience?JONES: At eBay, I had spent 80 percent of my time on the road. Moving to the solution-provider side was a big risk for me, but one of the real positives was it allowed me to work within two miles of where I lived. I had met Lohra Miller, the former district attorney of Salt Lake City, who talked to me about her technology project and her vision for helping the criminal justice world with petty crimes by educating offenders as opposed to having them arrested. It’s something I have always believed in. She advised me that she was a partner with the National Association for Shoplift Prevention (NASP), who I had been associated with for twenty years. Frank Johns and I rolled out one of the first retail pilots of NASP’s offender education program in Los Angeles twenty years ago. Given this technology startup was paired with a very reputable group of people that I knew were passionate about fixing shoplifting and helping retailers, I thought Turning Point Justice (TPJ) was a good fit for me.When I say that TPJ was a true startup, I really mean that. For the first six months we had a small office with plastic tables, using our own cellphones, and holding meetings in hotel lobbies to try to get sales and make things happen. I worked hard to get some key retailers to give us a chance and build our sales, and we did quite well with that. We were able to put operating disciplines in place to make sure we had good purchasing, that we had the right product. We were able to always continually adjust our technology product to make sure that we were in line with both legal and statutory requirements, whether it be district, state, or county.I really enjoyed the entrepreneurship. As you know, one day you’re doing HR work, the next day you’re recruiting, the next day you’re packing boxes and shipping stuff, or you’re on the phone with your retail counterpart. Some days that’s good, and some days you’re scratching your head saying, “What did I accomplish today?” as you’re driving to the mailbox to drop off shipments. It was a great experience for me to help build that company and put an infrastructure in place.EDITOR: You’ve also had one other very important industry involvement as one of the founding members of the Loss Prevention Foundation and are currently on its board of directors and executive committee. Why have you remained so actively involved in the Foundation?JONES: I remember sitting in a room talking about why our industry didn’t have an organization that was committed to developing the professionalism of the loss prevention industry. We all knew that there were many great leaders of loss prevention that you could put against any senior operator, and they could run the business as well as the next person. But how do we make sure that we didn’t lose the new generation of LP people coming in? I think that concern really inspired me to be part of the LP Foundation, to help be a beacon out there for loss prevention people coming in.I get a real kick out of going on LinkedIn and seeing these new loss prevention professionals so proud that they passed the LPC. And I just am proud to see that so many of these people that have gone through LPQ and LPC have gone on to be leaders in our business. I can testify that certification is not just something where you sign your name, pay the money, and get credentials. It’s a course that truly puts a framework around what it is that we should do as practitioners.I’m also proud that we have stayed on course and never strayed from our mission. It isn’t about making money or prestige. It’s about taking care of this profession and making sure that it continually grows, that it’s professional, and that it’s taking on new challenges. I know we have a number of new offerings coming out from the foundation, and I’m very excited about them.EDITOR: You deserve a lot of credit for where the foundation has grown today. If you could, reflect back on the last twenty years of what you’ve seen in the loss prevention industry and give us your thoughts on where we have been, where we are, and where we are going.JONES: I can say ten to fifteen years ago, we were all about driving numbers, hoping shrink would come along with it. Sometimes we had data, but most often we were going on instinct. As technology evolved and we had exception reporting, we learned how to use data to start driving decisions. In fact, what I saw in my career is that we in loss prevention did it better than the operators. We took the time to make sure that data drove decisions, and then we developed the solutions around what the data told us. We developed programs, built training, and awareness behind that, and then we saw our shrink get fixed.When you take that approach to allow data to drive the decisions, and you make the investment in getting the right people who are very smart, you’ll have a great solution. I hope to get people sitting around me that are smarter than I am and very diverse in their thinking. I’ve seen a number of times in our industry where retailers make an easy decision to put an operator to run a loss prevention organization. More often than not, it hasn’t worked out so well. It reminds me that an LP executive brings a unique discipline to the table with the understanding of how to put together what the data tells you with how to build a program and pull the levers to make sure that you are driving your shrink down, at the same time impacting your sales in a positive way and keeping people safe.Loss prevention professionals really are great leaders who add more and more value to their companies. If you look back to the aftermath of 9/11, most of us took on crisis management roles. As the world changed, we had to learn what to do about workplace violence and organized retail crime. Now we’re managing programs for active shooter. Some are starting to take on data-security roles and looking at cyber crime. And now risk management.Today as we move to a total cost of loss strategy, I think it helps us build a better return on investment. I believe most LP practitioners have always taken into consideration what the total cost of loss is, but now there is framing around it that creates a more powerful message to speak to the corporate business leaders.I really can’t think of another industry with professionals who add value and impact their company as much-an industry where a high percentage of people are willing to take phone calls, share a program, and give you their advice. That, to me, has made this a phenomenal industry to be part of. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

How Having (and Not Having) Big 12 Divisions Screwed Oklahoma State (Twice)

first_imgThe Big 12 is not implementing divisions which is pretty crazy. What would have happened to Oklahoma State in the five-year history of the Big 12 having 10 teams if divisions had existed all along? ESPN’s Max Olson took a look.Olson looked at each of the five Big 12 title scenarios from the five seasons since the Big 12 went to 10 teams. There is a bonkers scenario in 2013 in which OSU would have been kept from the Big 12 title game because of point differential on the final play of the season.On the final play of the game, Oklahoma State ran a desperation lateral play and goofed up. The backwards throw to QB Clint Chelf was errant and Eric Striker scooped the ball up and scored for a 33-24 victory. In this tiebreaker scenario, that play gives OU the spot in the Big 12 title game.So let’s put it this way: If Oklahoma State, down 27-24 against its hated rival, had instead sent Chelf out to take a knee and take the Bedlam loss, the Cowboys make the Big 12 title game.This is the world we now live in! That’s not all, though. The only year a conference championship game would have helped the Big 12? 2011.It might be hard to picture the BCS rankings moving the Cowboys into the national title game had they defeated K-State again. But Oklahoma State was only .0086 behind Alabama for the No. 2 spot. What if another win over a top-10 foe would have pushed the Cowboys ahead? This might have been one year where a Big 12 title game really could’ve helped.Sweet. Just more ways to twist that 2011 knife a little deeper! Conference championship games are pretty much never going to help the Big 12 make the CFB Playoff. Except it would have if the playoff was only two teams in 2011.So new ways are being invented for OSU to have retroactively been kept from playing for the 2011 title. The playoff is now four teams (OSU would have been in), and the Big 12 has a conference title game (OSU probably would have been in).I need a drink. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

Watch Guide: Week 10

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. Week 10 already?! Say it ain’t so. There are some good ones this weekend. TCU-Baylor, Bama-LSU, Arkansas-Florida, Nebraska-Ohio State and of course OU-Iowa State on a Thursday night in Ames. What in the world could ever go wrong with the top Big 12 team going as a three TD favorite to Jack Trice in November?!Thanks as always to Ryan Hartwig for his work.Weekend Watch Guide: Week 10last_img read more

Oklahoma State Getting Consistently Better On Offense This Year

first_imgDon’t look now but Oklahoma State has the 22nd-most efficient offense in the nation with two of the worst Big 12 defenses still on tap in Texas Tech and Oklahoma. Let’s take a look at this week’s points-per-drive numbers and how OSU has been consistently rising since conference play started.Offensive PPD screen-shot-2016-11-08-at-11-09-51-amHow about that? Oklahoma State is likely to catch Baylor and has a shot at getting over 3.0 by the end of the year which hasn’t happened since 2012 (3.01 in Monken’s last year). Kansas continues to Kansas. Tech continues to Tech, and the rest of the teams are just all right.To give you some perspective, Kansas State ranks No. 8 in the Big 12 in offensive points per drive but No. 43 nationally. That’s crazy. Now let’s look at defense.Defensive PPDscreen-shot-2016-11-08-at-11-09-58-amDespite what felt like a poor showing in Manhattan, OSU remains steadfast at No. 4 in the Big 12 in points per drive on defense. West Virginia continues to do the opposite of what I thought a Dana Holgorsen-coached team would do.For perspective, Kansas State is No. 5 in the Big 12 and No. 76 in the nation. Kansas, Iowa State and Texas Tech are three of the 12 least efficient teams in the country on defense.OSU actually only went from 2.11 PPD allowed on defense to 2.15 after Manhattan.“We didn’t play the run as well as we’d like to for a couple of reasons,” explained Glenn Spencer on Monday. “One was just the type of game I called to stop some of that quarterback run game and all that we have to play ‘zero’ coverage, and I didn’t do that as much as I’d like.“The double move about got us one time and they busted out on a bunch route when we were in man, which kind of made me uneasy about playing more aggressive, but that being said, we still needed to force some field goals. If we’d have done that a couple more times, we’d have been in good shape.“We gave up touchdowns after long drives, which is not what we like and we got shoved around a little bit. They have a good offensive line and up front we got pushed around a little bit. A couple of times backers got hit and sometimes the secondary would come up and get hit.”To his point on long drives, OSU is No. 53 nationally on points per drive given up on 80+ yard drives.Let’s take a closer look at where OSU has come from on offense …OSU’s Consistencyscreen-shot-2016-11-08-at-11-34-19-amHere’s how many points per drive OSU was averaging for the year after each conference game.A week over week over week improvement with a mild drop after Iowa State. The Texas game really provided a boost. This also meshes well with the eye test. OSU has just felt easier on O over the last four weeks than at the beginning of the season.“I think [our confidence is] pretty high, but at the same time you have to take it one game at a time,” said Yurcich on Monday. “I know that’s cliche, but really we have to play in the moment and focus on right now. Last week is over.“The biggest thing is you get confidence with each victory and when you play better. When you improve, you get more confidence, but at the same time, you have to take one game at a time as it comes to you. You can’t look into the future, and you can’t look at the past.“You have to focus on what is going to make you better. That’s the biggest key, and that’s what we have now. Our guys really understand that process of improvement.”This chart should help. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

Oklahoma State Moves up in Coaches, AP Poll

first_imgThe Cowboys advanced to 8-2 on the season on Saturday after holding off a furious comeback from the Red Raiders in the house that Boone built. OSU entered the week ranked No. 17 in both the Coaches and AP Polls, but losses from the teams ranked higher than them helped them move up several spots to No. 13 in the Coaches Poll, and No. 13 in the AP Poll.Here is the full AP top 25:AP Top-25, Week 12: ALA-61 OSU LOU MICH CLEM WIS WASH OU PSU WVU UTAH CU OKST WMU USC LSU FSU AUB NEB WSU FLA BSU TAMU SDSU TROY— RedditCFB (@RedditCFB) November 13, 2016Oklahoma State is ranked No. 13 in the college football playoff rankings, which will be updated on Tuesday evening. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

Oklahoma State Named Top 10 Over-Performing NFL Producer

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. The NFL Draft starts this Thursday, and Oklahoma State has some guys who hope their number (or name) is called early. And if it is, you can bet there’s a pretty good chance it’s going to lead to a successful NFL career.ESPN recently did a study on which schools produce the most underperforming and over-performing NFL players. The formula is a little bit convoluted so I’ll let them explain.Methodology: We pulled data from Pro-Football-Reference.com on the 3,831 players drafted since 2002 and broke them into eight position groups. Special teams are excluded since many of those players are acquired as undrafted free agents.Draft value: Picks are weighted by overall pick number, so early first-round picks carry more weight than late first-rounders.NFL performance: The formula for this factors in career Approximate Value, along with percentage of seasons as an All Pro/Pro Bowler/starter. The goal was to account for players like J.J. Watt who have been dominant over shorter stretches.Anyway, it essentially measures how good players are in the pro ranks against how many players a school puts there. The thinking being that the more pros you put in the NFL, the more All-Pros and/or elite starters you should hit on.Those who hit on fewer than what was expected scored low. Those who hit on more scored high. Oklahoma State was one of the 10 who hit on more. Here is the top 10.So basically Oklahoma State’s pros performed at a level that makes you think they got almost twice as many guys drafted as they actually did which is pretty great. Even with the Justin Gilbert flameout!“I watched [cornerback] Justin Gilbert play in the Big 12 for three years,” Bleacher Report’s Matt Miller told The Ringer. “He’s this 6-foot-tall, 200-pound corner that ran a 4.37, his three cone was sub-seven seconds, he was strong, and, athletically, he was everything you want. But Joe Thomas said it on Twitter. This is what happens when you don’t love football. It doesn’t matter how athletic you are, if you don’t love football, you’re not going to succeed.”Also Oklahoma State has had an absurd number of players that were drafted go on to make Pro Bowls.This includes Dez Bryant, Antonio Smith, Russell Okung, Kevin Williams and Dan Bailey. You can see the full list here (although ESPN only looked at the last 15 NFL Drafts).All of this is great of course, but I personally more about seeing a higher number of NFL Draft selections than I do the percentage of those who pan out on the pro level. That’s a selfish conceit, though, because I care more about Oklahoma State than I do about the Packers or 49ers or Bears.This data is less a indicator of which teams have performed well in college and more look at which colleges have gotten the right guys drafted. You would almost expect a school like OSU to score high here because, as the thinking goes, if somebody gets drafted out of Stillwater, they must really be good.Such is the perception, right or wrong, in college football and beyond.Still, it’s impressive that OSU has churned out so many high-quality players at the next level from a (relatively) small pool of candidates. Hopefully they can continue to increase both percentages as the Gundy era rolls on.last_img read more

Jarwin to Dallas Was OSU Fan Favorite From NFL Draft

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. I put out a poll question on Tuesday of which NFL move you guys liked best among the four most popular ones (in my opinion), and a surprising winner emerged. With 35 percent of the vote, Blake Jarwin was the favorite.Which NFL/#okstate fit was your favorite after last week’s Draft and free agent signings?— Pistols Firing (@pistolsguys) May 2, 2017In fact, the undrafted Jarwin and undrafted Jordan Sterns both won out over Vincent Taylor who got just 12 percent of the vote as he heads to Miami. I’m sure there were a variety of reasons for why you guys liked Jarwin to Dallas including:Favorite team is the CowboysCowboy-Cowboy symmetry with Bailey, Dez etc.Decent chance to make the team and playI think my favorite of these four was probably Sterns to Kansas City. Hayden Barber wrote terrifically about this earlier in the week, but I could see him rocking the red and yellow for the next six years as a solid NFL player. Will that pan out? Maybe, maybe not. But it’s a great situation for a franchise that seems like it knows what it’s doing.Your comments.Scott: Definitely not Taylor. Going to be hard to get much play time behind Suh.Edmond Poke: Coming from a phins fan here. VT will get his reps, Suh takes many plays off and if Taylor proves himself then the defense desperately needs himShane: Carson to Seattle. I don’t think they have a true RB1, and his style fits their offense.Enrique: Jarwin to Dallas mostly cause I’m a fan, but all of these are good guys making it to the next level which is great to see.last_img read more

Poll Results: Vast Majority Thinks Gundy Out-Recruiting Boynton

first_imgThe correct answer is probably Gundy, but this from Twitter follower Ric Ellis sums up my feelings nicely: Clearly Gundy right now but the fact that I hesitated for a moment says a lot about MBB recruiting effort.The point for me is that Boynton is doing a killer job getting transfers, securing the future and drumming up interest in the future of hoops in Stillwater. Here are some other comments from the Tuesday poll question.Zach Wilkerson: Hard to grade Boynton’s recruiting at the moment, he gets an A for effort but needs more time for results to come in (or not).Nate: Gundy. Not close. Anyone who says Boynton (who’s been on the job for 2 months) needs their head examined. And I’ll go on record stating I’m not a fan of what appears to be Boynton completely blowing off Texas recruiting. OSU needs guys from around this area. Not saying all, but at least some. He apparently shows no interest in Texas.Adam M.: A better poll for the day would have been: Did you know Mason Rudolph’s first name is Brett? Comparing the two seems kind of pointless right meow. Mike Gundy and Mike Boynton are both recruiting quite well in their respective sports right now, but a nearly 9-to-1 majority of you think Gundy is out-pacing his hoops counterpart.I thought this might happen when I put the poll out. Boynton has gotten Kendall Smith and Michael Weathers and kept Zach Dawson, but Gundy (or, ahem, an assistant) has snagged a host of offensive linemen to go with C.J. Moore in recent weeks.Tuesday poll. Which coach (and staff) is doing a better job recruiting?— Pistols Firing (@pistolsguys) May 9, 2017 While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more