A South Texas county drags PBMs into nationwide lawsuit over opioids

first_img By Casey Ross Feb. 26, 2018 Reprints [email protected] @caseymross National Technology Correspondent Casey covers the use of artificial intelligence in medicine and its underlying questions of safety, fairness, and privacy. He is the co-author of the newsletter STAT Health Tech. Tags legalopioidspharmaceuticals Pharma Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What’s included? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTEDcenter_img Log In | Learn More GET STARTED What is it? About the Author Reprints A South Texas county drags PBMs into nationwide lawsuit over opioids Casey Ross A massive lawsuit over the nation’s opioid crisis has largely ignored an influential group of companies in the prescription drug business — the financial middlemen who brokered access to the powerful pills that got so many people hooked.Perhaps that’s because their role is simply harder to see. Known as pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs), these companies secretly make the rules that determine the availability of drugs, and how much patients must pay out of pocket to get them. Alex Hogan/STATlast_img

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