Spreading North Korean Orphans’ Circumstances on Campus

first_img Tracking the “unidentified yellow substance” being dried out near the Yongbyon Nuclear Center Spreading North Korean Orphans’ Circumstances on Campus Facebook Twitter Analysis & Opinion Pence Cartoon: “KOR-US Karaoke” [imText1]Traditionally, South Korean university campuses have been a hotbed of left wing extremism. Recently, however, some diverse voices have been arising unawares. This sign of changing attitudes can easily be seen in students’ organizations advocating North Korean human rights. At the core of the change there is the Youth and Students Alliance for Human Rights in North Korea (Students Alliance), which leads North Korea human rights movements in college students’ unions. The Students Alliance is preparing the “North Korean Human Rights Campaign 2008” for the student conference which is being held on the 26th. Yoon Joo Yong, the representative for the Students Alliance, revealed the current preparations and the purpose of the event. Yoon believes that “60 percent of students have already got knowledge of North Korea but they do not know what they should do with it. Therefore, there has been inertia in the student movement to address North Korean human rights issues.” He said that “Many North Korean orphans staying in China still cannot enter South Korea, but students can work voluntarily for these children. We will spread news of the conditions for North Korean orphans in China, children who inherit the North Korean depressed reality from their parent’s generation.”Yoon revealed their plan, “If we release the stories of these orphans, who aren’t protected by any laws or by any adults, through the Internet or on university campuses, we can generate charity to bring them safely into South Korea. After entering South Korea we plan to link student volunteers to them to teach and help them adapt to South Korean society.”Regarding student opinions of North Korea, Yoon explained that “In the previous situation, where information inflow was mostly blocked, students of the time had only pro- or anti-North Korean ideologies. But now, many students try to consider North Korea rationally and without bias.” He added, “We have shared information on human rights issues with the U.S., Japan, defectors, and South Korean students through this kind of international conference. We plan to further spread the issue to European students too through a kind of mock EU Assembly. We will also include some more international topics like the Myanmar issue and the problems of other third world countries.” The Student Alliance has been holding mock congresses, student festivals to advocate North Korean human rights, forums and other events since 2005. SHARE AvatarKim So Yeol center_img Is Nuclear Peace with North Korea Possible? Analysis & Opinion By Kim So Yeol – 2008.09.25 1:35pm Analysis & Opinion Analysis & Opinion RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img

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