O’Donnell: Incident under review, but no reaction likely

first_imgBusch walked with purpose toward Logano after exiting his car on pit road, then lunged at his rival after reaching him. The two were pulled apart, but Busch wound up at the bottom of a pile in a scuffle with officials and crews. A NASCAR official escorted Busch, bloodied by a nick on his forehead, from the scene. “It’s certainly under review,” O’Donnell said. “We have to take everything, make sure we look at all the video, but just from our in assessment last night, as far as on-track I don’t think we saw anything that was intentional by any means. We have to have discussions with both drivers. I think our intention would be not to react unless we see something we haven’t seen yet.” RELATED: What Busch, Logano said | How other drivers reacted RELATED: Another angle of the Busch-Logano conflictMORE: Photos of the incident Steve O’Donnell, NASCAR Executive Vice President and Chief Racing Development Officer, said Monday that competition officials were continuing to review Sunday’s post-race conflict between Kyle Busch and Joey Logano at Las Vegas Motor Speedway, but the sanctioning body is inclined “not to react” pending further video review. “It’s an emotional sport,” O’Donnell added, “and I think it shows exactly how much every position on the track means.” O’Donnell said NASCAR’s competition department was reviewing video footage of the incident, which stemmed from on-track contact between the two drivers’ cars on the last lap of Sunday’s Kobalt 400. Logano’s No. 22 Ford slid into Busch’s No. 18 Toyota in between Turns 3 and 4. The bump sent Busch spinning to a 22nd-place finish, while Logano drove away to place fourth.RELATED: See what led to the pit road incident O’Donnell’s remarks came Monday morning in a guest appearance on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio’s “Morning Drive” program. “What our position has been is that we want to leave it in the drivers’ hands,” O’Donnell said. “What we don’t want to see — and the drivers have asked for this, which is very fair — is a crew member initially approaching a driver or initiating some type of altercation with a driver. The early review of this is, this was two drivers with crew members kind of stepping back. Once something happens, a crew is taught, which I think is right, that if someone comes up in your pit box and attacks your guy, you have the right to try and break that up or bring it to a stop. I think that was the initial review that we saw.”</p> Asked about the possibility on punishment for crew members on Logano’s No. 22 team, who jumped into the fray after Busch threw a swing, O’Donnell reinforced that NASCAR prefers to leave things in the hands of its drivers. NASCAR officials had no immediate comment about the incident Sunday. O’Donnell also said that officials from the sanctioning body would bring Busch and Logano together for further discussions before getting back on track at Phoenix Raceway.last_img read more

Behind the Scenes with Calgary Medics

first_imgCALGARY (Global News) – They wear bulletproof vests, dodge bodily fluids on a regular basis, and are trained to execute highly-skilled, life-saving techniques while riding the back of a bumpy ambulance. They’re paramedics, and they’ve given Global News a behind-the-scenes look at the challenges medical professional face every day.last_img

Leprachaun Legion expands to all athletic clubs

first_imgNotre Dame’s student body has always been a spirited group, but this year, the Leprechaun Legion is making changes that they hope will improve the overall atmosphere of all sporting events. “Our goal is to try to find different ways to get students to come to games,” Matthew Cunningham, president of Leprechaun Legion, said.  “We want to keep them entertained and engaged and loud and to create kind of a home field advantage.” To encourage maximum participation from the student body, the Legion has recently decided to expand itself so that every sport will have its own loud, boisterous student section. “The Legion last year focused on basketball,” vice president, Kristen Stoutenburgh, said. “It’s historically been men’s basketball so we expanded to encompass not just the student section at basketball games but also the student section at all sporting events. Every student on campus is part of the Leprechaun Legion.” But for those who want to be more involved in the Legion than simply attending various athletic contests, new changes in the organization’s leadership structure will provide a way. The Leprechaun Legion board is comprised of an executive council, board leaders, marketing members, and the board of student representatives. Essentially, the board will work to find areas in which the student section can improve, Cunningham said. “We have weekly meetings and we talk Notre Dame athletics about how to make them the best that they can possibly be,” Stoutenburgh said. “ There are also individual sports committees, which take charge of the student section for their particular sport.  Any student can join a sports committee. “I think we have a great student section,” Cunningham said.  “I think part of the reason people come to Notre Dame is the great athletic programs.  But we can do better.” He noted that last year’s decision to add music to the football games as an example. “It added a great dimension to the stadium atmosphere,” Cunningham said. Other things like the Leprechaun Legion shirts, which were distributed at several sporting events early in the year, serve to bring the student body together as a united force, Stoutenburgh said. “They’re not just there to watch.  They’re there to be a fan and support their team,” she said. The bigger, more excited student sections will unite fans, but they will also lend support to the athletes. “We want to be the best, not only for our own enjoyment but also to support the players and the coaches,” Stoutenburgh said.  “Athletes know the Legion stands behind them.” The energy the student section generates can play a crucial role in Notre Dame games. “Coaches will say ‘Yeah, the crowd was great today, it really gave us a boost when we needed it,’” Cunningham said. “That’s what we’re trying to do here – give the students and coaches that extra energy.” In the end, the Leprechaun Legion serves two purposes.  It is a voice for the student body within the athletic department and it brings fans and athletes together. “There’s not that big separation between us,” Stoutenburgh said.  “We’re all one team.” For more information on the Leprechaun Legion, email [email protected] with your name and sport of interest.,Notre Dame’s student body has always been a spirited group, but this year, the Leprechaun Legion is making changes that they hope will improve the overall atmosphere of all sporting events. “Our goal is to try to find different ways to get students to come to games,” Matthew Cunningham, president of Leprechaun Legion, said.  “We want to keep them entertained and engaged and loud and to create kind of a home field advantage.” To encourage maximum participation from the student body, the Legion has recently decided to expand itself so that every sport will have its own loud, boisterous student section. “The Legion last year focused on basketball,” vice president, Kristen Stoutenburgh, said. “It’s historically been men’s basketball so we expanded to encompass not just the student section at basketball games but also the student section at all sporting events. Every student on campus is part of the Leprechaun Legion.” But for those who want to be more involved in the Legion than simply attending various athletic contests, new changes in the organization’s leadership structure will provide a way. The Leprechaun Legion board is comprised of an executive council, board leaders, marketing members, and the board of student representatives. Essentially, the board will work to find areas in which the student section can improve, Cunningham said. “We have weekly meetings and we talk Notre Dame athletics about how to make them the best that they can possibly be,” Stoutenburgh said. “ There are also individual sports committees, which take charge of the student section for their particular sport.  Any student can join a sports committee.” “I think we have a great student section,” Cunningham said.  “I think part of the reason people come to Notre Dame is the great athletic programs.  But we can do better.” He noted that last year’s decision to add music to the football games as an example. “It added a great dimension to the stadium atmosphere,” Cunningham said. Other things like the Leprechaun Legion shirts, which were distributed at several sporting events early in the year, serve to bring the student body together as a united force, Stoutenburgh said. “They’re not just there to watch.  They’re there to be a fan and support their team,” she said. The bigger, more excited student sections will unite fans, but they will also lend support to the athletes. “We want to be the best, not only for our own enjoyment but also to support the players and the coaches,” Stoutenburgh said.  “Athletes know the Legion stands behind them.” The energy the student section generates can play a crucial role in Notre Dame games. “Coaches will say ‘Yeah, the crowd was great today, it really gave us a boost when we needed it,’” Cunningham said. “That’s what we’re trying to do here – give the students and coaches that extra energy.” In the end, the Leprechaun Legion serves two purposes.  It is a voice for the student body within the athletic department and it brings fans and athletes together. “There’s not that big separation between us,” Stoutenburgh said.  “We’re all one team.” For more information on the Leprechaun Legion, email [email protected] with your name and sport of interest.last_img read more

Meckling dies after fall from JACC

first_imgBilly Meckling, a 21-year-old male senior set to graduate this weekend, died in the early morning hours Saturday after falling from the roof of the Joyce Athletic and Convocation Center (JACC), the University announced.“Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends after this terrible tragedy,” University President Fr. John Jenkins said in a press release. “It is a profound sadness for all of us, on this graduation weekend, to lose someone so young and brimming with promise.”Meckling will be remembered at Saturday’s Baccalaureate mass, Jenkins said in an email sent to the student body.At 3:45 a.m., two students requesting assistance approached a Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) officer. On the east side of the JACC, the officer found Meckling unresponsive. Despite attempts at CPR and emergency medical care, he never regained consciousness, the press release stated.According to initial investigations, the senior was part of a group of students of who gained access to the roof of the JACC, which was wet after several days of rain in the past week, the press release said.Meckling was a four-year member and two-time monogram winner for the Irish varsity fencing team.“When one thinks of the success of Notre Dame fencing, names like Gerek Meinhardt and Lee Kiefer come to mind,” head fencing coach Gia Kyaratskhelia said in a press release. “Yet equally integral to our team success are the unsung names, the walk-ons that bring the positive spirit, energy and camaraderie to our practices and competitions to push their teammates and themselves to greater heights. Billy Meckling was one of those teammates – an invaluable member of our sabre squad who left such a massive impact on all of us as a fencer and a human being.“On the strip, Billy was a talented fencer and a determined worker on a very competitive sabre squad – evidenced by his earned monograms during the 2012 and 2014 seasons. More importantly, he was a great friend to all members of our program. A true Notre Dame man, his kindness and warmth impacted each and every one of us – and make his loss all the more difficult.”last_img read more

Emerald ash borer found in Vermont

first_imgPhoto caption and credit: Emerald Ash Borer gallery in Vermont; Credit: Nate SiegertVermont Business Magazine The Vermont Department of Forests, Parks & Recreation (VTFPR) and the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Foods & Markets (VAAFM) report that emerald ash borer (EAB), a destructive forest insect from Asia, has been detected in Vermont. Officials with the USDA Animal & Plant Health and Inspection Service (APHIS) have confirmed the identification of a beetle recently found in northern Orange County, Vermont. The insect was reported through the vtinvasives.org(link is external) website.EAB overwinter as larvae under the bark of ash trees where they feed on the inner bark tissue. Once infested, ash trees rapidly decline and are killed in 3-5 years. This pest is known to be established in 32 states and three Canadian provinces, and is responsible for widespread decline and mortality of hundreds of millions of ash trees in North America.Ash trees comprise approximately 5% of Vermont forests and are also a very common and important urban tree. EAB threatens white ash, green ash and black ash in Vermont and could have significant ecological and economic impacts. There are no proven means to control EAB in forested areas, though individual trees can sometimes be effectively treated.State and federal forest health officials have convened and are preparing to implement an emergency action plan in response to the recent EAB detection in Vermont. A multi-agency delineation survey effort, including personnel from VAAFM, VTFPR, APHIS, US Forest Service and the University of Vermont Extension, will be launched in the upcoming days to determine the extent of the EAB infestation. Results of the survey will inform subsequent management recommendations and quarantine decisions and will be released to the public.Slowing the spread of EAB is very important. While adult EAB are capable of flying short distances, humans have accelerated spread by moving infested material, particularly firewood, long distances. Residents and visitors are reminded to protect Vermont’s forests by buying and burning local firewood.Landowners with questions are encouraged to contact their county forester. You can find county foresters on this website: http://fpr.vermont.gov/forest/your_woods/county_forest/who_where(link is external).A public information meeting is being planned and details will be announced shortly.Source: VT AAFM 2.27.2018last_img read more

Faculty union says Vermont State College contract negotiations reach impasse

first_imgVermont State Colleges,Vermont Business Magazine After a five-month contract bargaining process, the Vermont State College Faculty Federation (the union representing faculty at the Vermont State Colleges) and the administration of the VSC System have reached impasse in our negotiations.According to the union, the administration proposed numerous cuts to the existing faculty contract, including an effective pay cut over the life of the contract as well as reductions to benefits. The administration also made a number of proposals aimed at substantially altering work expectations and increasing workload, weakening the job security of VSC faculty, and requiring faculty to teach on campuses hours away from the campus on which they were hired to teach. The administration has stated that the VSC system is struggling financially. Faculty and student support staff have borne the burden of this budget mismanagement, while no positions in the Chancellor’s office have been cut. According to Linda Olson, Castleton faculty member and Vice President of education for AFT-VT) “While 35 faculty members and student support staff lost their jobs, had reductions in their jobs or were incentivized to retire at Castleton University due to a budget shortfall, administrative positions have increased at the central office.” Faculty and staff have been told to expect more VSC layoffs in December. The union’s analysis of VSC’s budget shows that administrative spending within the system is more than twice as high as administrative spending at institutions that the VSC identifies as its peers. Over the past five years, median executive salaries in the VSC have risen by nearly 9%, while median faculty salaries have failed to keep pace with inflation. From 2015-2018, the amount of the budget devoted to instruction has declined by nearly 5%, while the amount devoted to administration has increased by more than 16%.“We do not believe that these spending priorities are in the best interest of our students or our institutions,” stated Lisa Cline, President of the VSC Faculty Federation. “As faculty of the VSC, we want to ensure that our colleges remain a source of high-quality, affordable higher education for Vermonters. We know that education is a pathway to a better life and increased earning potential. The opportunity to be part of the transformation that education offers is a significant part of what attracted many of us to VSC in the first place. We strongly believe the VSC should prioritize instruction and direct support for students.”The primary mission of the VSC—providing affordable, high quality public higher education—requires spending on instruction, including faculty compensation to attract and retain skilled faculty. Further, part of the stated vision of the VSC is to “be recognized as a great place to work, in terms of what it offers employees”. The faculty union is calling on the VSC administration to recommit to this mission and vision by supporting faculty with a fair and reasonable contract. Faculty are the core of our institutions; our working conditions are our students’ learning conditions. Source: Vermont State College Faculty Federation 8.18.2018last_img read more

JoCo district attorney reducing traffic diversion fees; Republican Carl Turner enters race for District 28 seat in Kansas House

first_imgJoCo district attorney reducing traffic diversion feesThe Johnson County District Attorney’s Office is reducing traffic diversion fees to $30 flat fee for all offenses. The change is effective immediately and ends June 15.The traffic diversion program allows motorists to keep traffic tickets from appearing on their record.The district attorney’s office cited “the significant financial impact” of COVID-19 on the community as the reason for the change. The statutory court costs of $109.50 remains.Republican Carl Turner enters race for District 28 state repCarl Turner, a Republican from Leawood, has launched his campaign for state representative in District 28, the seat currently held by Rep. Kellie Warren, who recently announced her bid for the State Senate. Warren’s candidacy sets up a primary against incumbent John Skubal. Former Republican Rep. Joy Koesten, who switched parties after losing the 2018 election to Warren, is running for the Senate seat as a Democrat.Turner’s professional background is in finance, process improvement and project management.Water main breaks on Merriam Drive past 53rd Street, WaterOne respondsThe city of Merriam on Wednesday afternoon announced a water main break on Merriam Drive, just past 53rd Street. Soon after the announcement, WaterOne was on site to repair the break, which took approximately four to six hours, according to Merriam’s Facebook post.Residents can receive water outage alerts via Notify JoCo and can register here.last_img read more

June 1, 2015 Letters

first_img Letters Bush v. GoreWith all due respect given to Florida Supreme Court Justice Major Harding, the reality of the decision in Bush v. Gore by a 5-4 margin rendered by the U.S. Supreme Court effectively disenfranchised the presidential voters in our state of Florida for the year of 2000. (Harding shares some backstory from Bush v. Gore, May 1 News.)The disparity of interpretations of this decision will remain forever; however, in my personal opinion, Bush v. Gore was the beginning of the impending end of our democratic government in the United States of America.Though Gore came in second in the electoral vote, he received 543,895 more popular votes than Bush. The official presidential general election results were Gore 50,999,897 and Bush 50,456,002.Without giving a litany of all the subsequent decisions by a 5-4 margin in our U.S. Supreme Court, it is sufficient to say that democracy, as it is defined in our English language, has been eviscerated and undermined.I, for one American-born citizen for 87 years, am proud to be in this country, and I do wholeheartedly agree with the bumper sticker that said “Election 2000, what a civics lesson.”However, with respect for everyone’s personal opinion, I do not think “that confirms the Supreme Court did well.”Russell Lee Johnson St. Petersburg Remote Viewing of Files As general counsel for Chips Shore, Manatee County clerk of the circuit court, the pilot office for remote visibility of court records, and as a member of the Access Governance Board, I feel that it is important to clarify some misunderstandings that may occur once remote viewing becomes available in more counties as the year progresses.Redaction of court records is a cause for concern for many. It is important to remember that in no way does remote viewing deny constitutional access to court records. Remote viewing allows for the convenience of viewing court records without having to travel to the courthouse. In order to provide this convenience and balance the privacy interests of parties, the redaction of confidential information is necessary to guard against such things as identity theft. Remote viewing takes place on a known website. Clerks are charged with protecting confidential information within a court file.There are three levels of confidentiality within a court file: case type; document type; and information contained within the documents that are placed inside of a court file. The security matrix for remote viewing protects court records at both the case and document types. Necessary redactions are inclusive of this security model. All users who choose to view a court file remotely via a clerk’s website will see a file with the legal redactions in place. Any information that would be necessary to redact in order to protect a client’s information, such as a Social Security number, would be redacted. The remote viewing capability of a court file was not intended to replace case management systems utilized by those users working directly within the court system.The remote viewing of a court file is not about the constitutional right to access a file; rather, it is about the convenience of remote visibility. This model has been in use in Manatee County for 10 years and has proven to be acceptable to all users who wish to remotely view court records.Angelina Colonneso Bradenton June 1, 2015 Letters June 1, 2015 Letterslast_img read more

Groenewegen tosses no-no, Gophers split two games

first_imgGroenewegen shined in the circle, too, striking out seven in the no-hitter. But in the fourth inning of the first game, senior Hannah Granger muscled a ball into the outfield. The Gophers eventually put up three more runs and came close to a fourth, but Groenewegen was thrown out at home on a Granger double. After the Gophers tied the game at one off a LeMay single over the shortstop’s head, NDSU took control.  Her inside-the-park home run and sophomore Sara Groenewegen’s no-hitter marked two rare occurrences in one game. Pitchers Kylie Stober and Nikki Anderson combined to give up four runs in the fifth inning. “I think we did some things very, very well,” Allister said. “They have a very good pitcher, and North Dakota State is a very good team. There are some takeaways of things we need to get better at, but I thought we played some very good softball today.” Even though a short 20-minute break separated the games, Minnesota struggled to continue its momentum. “Obviously, I wanted to score because I was the tying run,” Groenewegen said. “We [have to] trust coach Allister’s judgment. Obviously, it didn’t turn out into our favor, but they made a really good play, and they made two perfect throws. There’s not much you could really do.” Granger finished running the last 60 feet and sprinted across home plate, completing an inside-the-park home run, helping Minnesota win the first game 8-0. TheGophers lost the second game 5-4. As she rounded third, head coach Jessica Allister told her to “please get there.” Through the first three innings, North Dakota State held the Gophers scoreless, and Minnesota found itself losing 1-0 because of an RBI single in the first inning. “We just have to have the mentality that every pitch could change a game. Every pitch that we get, it’s an opportunity to get ahead,” Granger said. “She did great. She had command of her off-speed. She had command inside and outside. She was pitching aggressively. She was pitching competitively. She shut down a good offense,” Allister said. Groenewegen tosses no-no, Gophers split two games Matt GreensteinApril 23, 2015Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintWith heavy gusts coming inward, home runs weren’t likely in the Gophers’ doubleheader against North Dakota State on Wednesday. In the first game, Groenewegen gave Minnesota a quick lead with an RBI single and eventually scored off a Taylor LeMay single. “I saw the ball hit in front of the girl, and I thought, ‘This may be a triple,’” Granger said. “[Allister] kept waving her arm around, and I thought, ‘I could make it all the way.’ Everyone was trying to get me water because I couldn’t breathe [afterward].”last_img read more

Yahoo! searches for 80,000 sq ft London HQ

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img