Report: 911 Calls to Cleveland Jail Has Tripled

first_imgCLEVELAND — The number of EMS calls coming from jail inmatesis straining the system, according to a report. Cuyahoga County Sheriff David Schilling tells the station the numbers spike when there is no jail doctor working. FOX 8 reports Cleveland EMS already struggles to handle the volume of 911 calls from citizens. Add on top of that the number of inmates who are taken to the hospital, which has tripled. Related: Calif. Firefighters Outline Problems Responding to Medical Calls at Jail Above photo: A Cleveland EMS ambulance via the city’s Twitter page. The Cuyahoga County Council Public Safety Committee reportedlysays it does not know why the number of inmates leaving for emergencies has skyrocketed. “That’s when we have more calls for inmates taken to thehospital during the weekends and during the nighttime hours,” he said. Taxpayers are on the hook for inmates’ medical bills and thecosts to have deputies stand guard at the hospital. “We’ve got to get to the bottom of this,” said Public Safety Committee Chairman Michael Gallagher. “It looks like we’re losing a lot of money. And it’s gotta make sense.”last_img read more

Chef Andrés Turns Michelin-Starred Restaurants into Kitchens Serving Take-Out Food to Anyone Who Needs It

first_imgRELATED: Corner Store Owner Gives Away More Than $6,000 in Free Goods to Seniors Preparing for QuarantinesThe makeshift soup kitchens will begin serving takeout meals starting today between noon and 5PM. Furthermore, all of his employees will be getting paid time off for the first two weeks.Andrés’s charity, World Central Kitchen, has also been serving up meals to people affected by the coronavirus, including the quarantined cruise ship passengers and staffers aboard the Grand Princess.From Little Rock, Arkansas to San Francisco, the charity has already served up several thousand meals to students and families amidst school closures. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreFor years, Chef José Andrés and his charity have been praised for feeding the world’s most vulnerable people—and now, he is turning his own 5-star restaurants into food kitchens for families who may be having trouble making ends meet during the COVID-19 outbreaks.Although Andrés announced that this restaurants will be closed to the general public until further notice, the celebrity chef did say that eight of his acclaimed Washington D.C. and New York City locations would still be serving gourmet food to out-of-work families and struggling workers.The soup kitchen employees will be asking for $7 per to-go meal, but for “those who cannot afford to pay, we will welcome as well,” Andrés added in a statement. Pass On The Positivity By Sharing The Good News With Your Friends On Social Media…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

SM North Indians and other Native American mascots in SMSD would be retired with new policy

first_imgSeveral Shawnee Mission schools could have new mascots by the end of the school year.The Shawnee Mission Board of Education is on track to consider a new mascot policy as early as at its Jan. 25 regular meeting, which could lead to several mascots in the district being changed — including the Indians of Shawnee Mission North High School — by the end of the 2020-2021 school year.The process is advancing after a SM North alumni-led group started a petition this summer pressing the district to change the high school’s Indian mascot, as well as other mascots referencing Native Americans, such as the Belinder Elementary Braves.Last month, the district’s policy committee agreed to review and draft language to potentially make changes.Jamie Borgman, Shawnee Mission Northwest area board member, said she wants to ensure the community understands why the committee took on the mascot policy in the first place.“I just want our community to understand that the purpose of this [new policy] is to make changes based on our strategic plan and the public outcry,” SM Northwest area board member Jamie Borgman said during Thursday’s policy committee meeting.“We don’t want people to feel like we’re doing this work just to do the work.”Policy details and potential implementationUnder the new policy, if adopted by the full SMSD board of education, Native American mascots would not be in compliance, said Sara Goodburn, SM North area board member.Sara Goodburn, SM North area member and policy committee chairperson, said the new policy language regarding mascots would be listed directly after current policy language that prohibits discrimination, harassment and retaliation, listed as policy AC. Goodburn read through the policy draft that outlines the role of mascots and defines the term.The policy language includes a list of five requirements all school mascots must meet, and a clause addressing how to handle mascots that fail to meet those standards. After some discussion and editing, the committee finalized the following requirements for all district mascots:Mascots will not be derogatory or offensive to a person or class of persons based on a protected class as defined in policy AC (found here, though it includes a person’s race, color, national origin and ancestry).Mascots will not make reference toward a person or class of persons based on a protected class as defined in policy AC.Mascots will be culturally and racially sensitive and appropriate.Mascots will depict individuals with fairness, dignity and respect.Mascots will not run counter to the district’s mission of creating a fully unified, equitable and inclusive culture.How mascot removal would workAnd the committee agreed to this language that address what would happen to mascots not in compliance with the new standards:If the board determines that a mascot fails to comply with this policy, then the mascot will be retired and a new mascot for the school will be selected through a process approved by the superintendent.Under the new policy, if adopted by the full SMSD board of education, Native American mascots would not be in compliance, Goodburn said.After the policy’s adoption, the board would need to adopt a resolution stating which mascots fail to comply — which would be reviewed by legal counsel, superintendent Mike Fulton said Thursday.If the policy is adopted and a resolution to retire a particular school’s mascot is passed, Fulton would work with individual principals to identify a transition process that would work for their school’s community. The process is anticipated to differ from school to school, specifically from elementary schools to middle and high schools.Students, Fulton said, have a role in helping choose a new school mascot, and once a new mascot goes through the community and school administration, SMSD’s superintendent would have the final approval.Fulton said a new mascot for any school would not be his choice, but the final decision would come back to him “as a safeguard.”Where the timeline standsThe full board of education is set to have a first reading of the new mascot policy at its Dec. 21 board meeting. The policy committee will reconvene on Jan. 7 to discuss any potential changes to the draft, and it will go before the board for consideration — and to be potentially approved — as early as Jan. 25.Shawnee Mission Superintendent Mike Fulton said while not everything with mascot imagery can be changed overnight, a new mascot could likely be decided on within one semester.Fulton said changes in schools’ signage, team uniforms and other logistical factors would not happen overnight. Although the full implementation of new mascots might take time, Fulton said the decision on a new mascot could be made within the same semester, suggesting schools like SM North could have new mascots by the end of the 2020-21 school year.“It’s not unreasonable to think it can be done by the end of the school year, by the following school year,” Fulton said. “There are considerations to make sure the process really has time to vet itself out.”Public inputThe public can provide comments on the new policy on Dec. 21, though the board will not formally vote on at that meeting in an effort to hear from varying perspectives.Two opposing groups, led by SM North alums, have remained active promoting their differing opinions on the issue through online petitions and Facebook groups.One petition “Change the SMN Mascot by the School’s 100th Anniversary” has gained more than 3,400 signatures. The counter-petition, urging the mascot to remain has gained more than 2,700 signatures.Borgman said changing the district’s Native American mascots is something that’s been discussed for years, and as a result, it might merit waiving the first reading. Jessica Hembree, Shawnee Mission South area member, said while she’s enthusiastic about the new policy, she thinks it should travel at the same speed as anything else.“I want to see this pass super bad, I’m glad we’re taking this up, but I keep reminding myself I don’t think it should move any faster or any slower than any other policy based on its content,” Hembree said.last_img read more

Why women ‘opt out’ of the workforce

first_imgYahoo India: Washington, July 29 (ANI): A new research from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University have explained why many Americans fail to see persistent gender barriers between man and women at work front.The research demonstrates that the common American assumption that behaviour is a product of personal choice fosters the belief that opportunities are equal and that gender barriers no longer exist in today’s workplace.The study suggested that the assumption that women “opt out” of the workforce, or have the choice between career or family, promotes the belief that individuals are in control of their fates and are unconstrained by the environment.“Although we’ve made great strides toward gender equality in American society, significant obstacles still do, in fact, hold many women back from reaching the upper levels of their organizations,” said co-author Nicole M. Stephens, assistant professor of management and organizations at the Kellogg School of Management.“In our research, we sought to determine how the very idea of ‘opting out,’ or making a choice to leave the workplace, may be maintaining these social and structural barriers by making it more difficult to recognize gender discrimination,” added Stephens.Read the whole story: Yahoo India More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

FBI Charges Los Lunas Man With Making Threats

first_imgThe FBI has arrested Lawrence Kenneth Garcia, 49, of Los Lunas on a federal complaint charging him with making threats using interstate communications.Garcia was arrested Tuesday, Nov. 5 in Albuquerque. He had an initial appearance Wednesday, Nov. 6 in U.S. District Court in Albuquerque and a preliminary/detention hearing was set for Thursday, Nov. 7.The U.S. Secret Service assisted with the investigation.The public is reminded all defendants are considered innocent unless convicted in a court of law. FBI News:last_img

Capital & Regional funds hit by UK retail woes

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Saïd to launch $1bn global property drive

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Funding awarded to explore power of LNG cold

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Caloric boosts Indonesia market position

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Survitec recommends increasing oxygen onboard vessels

first_imgWhile IMDG Code and MFAG guidelines require operators to carry 44 litres of medical oxygen at 200 bar as minimum, Jan-Oskar Lid, Global Technical Sales Manager – Fire, Rescue & Safety, Survitec, said the current minimum will not be enough in the event of a new outbreak.“Most vessels will carry one 40 litre cylinder and two smaller two litre cylinders. A 40 litre cylinder operating at 200 bar with a flowrate of max 25 litres per minute will last for about 5.3 hours, but this is unlikely to be enough to treat more than one Covid-19 patient if a medical evacuation is not possible or cylinders cannot be quickly replaced,” he said.A healthy adult requires about seven litres of oxygen per minute, but Covid-19 can deplete this to dangerous levels.Depending on the severity of the infection, a single Covid-19 patient would need between two and 15 litres of oxygen per minute, Survitec highlighted.In exceptional circumstances, Stage 4 Oxygen Escalation Therapy has required 60 litres per minute.“Although the number of cylinders stored onboard depends on a range of factors such as number of crew/passengers, type of cargoes carried and sailing/operating area, clearly, the current minimum will not be enough to treat multiple persons infected with the virus,” Lid said.“We therefore recommend that ship/offshore installation operators and owners increase the number of cylinders they currently have onboard.”last_img read more