Exclusive: The City’s hunger for success is infectious, says tech guru

first_imgDigital innovation should be viewed as a key metric for economic recovery post Covid-19. As we navigate a record economic slump, nourishing positive forms of disruption will be imperative. Our ability to provide expert agnostic technology advice and convene different players across the ecosystem –  startups, corporates and academics – will become even more critical in this period. It’s all very well taking your existing contacts remote, but when it comes to forging new partnerships, that’s pretty difficult to do from afar. Michiel Willems Anything else you’d like to share with our readers? What’s more, ‘show and tell’ activities taking place remotely involve an element of curation and structure. Having this happen over video link doesn’t allow for serendipitous encounters, and it’s harder to create a collaborative atmosphere. So you believe there is still a place for ‘physical’ accelerators – or are they dead? A final word of caution: at a pivotal time for our economy, we must get the balance right between supporting lots of new business creation, and providing persistent support for existing companies who are looking to invest in advanced digital technologies to increase their competitiveness and reduce their carbon emissions. If we can achieve both, then we’ll really be on to something! As lockdown lifts even further this week, and industries begin to emerge from the pandemic, City A.M. sits down with Silver to discuss the role and importance of digital innovation as a key metric for economic recovery post Covid-19. What are the results of not having physical access to tech labs or on-premise accelerators?  Also Read: Exclusive: The City’s hunger for success and willingness to push boundaries is infectious, says tech guru Show Comments ▼ Since the start of the pandemic, the entire economy and its workforce have moved online, with technology and digital tools keeping many businesses going. whatsapp whatsapp What impact has accelerators going ‘remote’ had on innovation in the pandemic? How have you seen businesses adapt their offerings during the pandemic? Monday 10 May 2021 11:44 am There is a human factor to accelerators and meeting with mentors became more structured. Working remotely actually intensified the focus of the cohorts, but it did also make it less fun. Virtual beer and pizza just doesn’t taste the same. Also Read: Exclusive: The City’s hunger for success and willingness to push boundaries is infectious, says tech guru Also Read: Exclusive: The City’s hunger for success and willingness to push boundaries is infectious, says tech guru Admittedly, digital tech companies had something of an advantage, and many saw a boost in their business as the lockdown intensified. But many companies were forced to respond to radically changed markets: those that adapted most quickly and smartly pivoted their offerings and thrived. Tags: Edtech FinTech Healthtech Proptech Tech City Also Read: Exclusive: The City’s hunger for success and willingness to push boundaries is infectious, says tech guru Hugely. The UK is home to some of the brightest pioneers in the world, who will be firmly at the centre of plans to build back better, greener and level up. In March last year, within 24 hours of making the decision to work from home – a week ahead of the PM’s edict – we put most of our 80 projects online and carried on working. To say we didn’t skip a beat would be pushing it, but it was amazing how fast we were able to resume service – albeit not normal – and most of our partner companies came too. There’s no denying that virtual and hybrid ways of working are the future, but I would expect to see a notable innovation lag if physical clusters and hubs completely ceased to exist indefinitely. I think we might also see something of an offline rebellion once the virus has really disappeared – some people will just be desperate not to be online. We had some delays to our 5G accelerator programmes because they involve businesses literally getting their hands on the technology and doing practical integration work at a hardware level on our testbeds – but those that could access remotely did so. Absolutely, there’s an important role for socialising. Some argue that having a quieter, less distracting environment at home means creativity can more easily flow, and this well may be true. The virtual investor showcases we ran attracted far larger numbers of investors (angels, syndicates and funds) than pre-lockdown, and they loved it. We’ve also shifted our lab activities to make them remote wherever possible, by shipping kit to participants. What’s more, for the startup community, having the chance to access advanced tech labs to test products and services in real-world environments can be critical. Having cost-effective access to physical infrastructure and testbeds is a crucial part of developing use cases for  tech and wider business offerings. Jeremy Silver, CEO of Digital Catapult Exclusive: The City’s hunger for success and willingness to push boundaries is infectious, says tech guru Many of our programmes also rely on startups producing prototypes and showcasing them to investors, and the fact that we cannot facilitate on-premise demos and showcases makes it more challenging to attract and excite funders. But investors were also struggling to maintain deal flow, since companies coming in and pitching was just not happening. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeLivestlyPlugs Have These Two Holes At The End, Here’s WhyLivestlyAll Things Auto | Search AdsNew Cadillac’s Finally On SaleAll Things Auto | Search AdsFactableAluminum Foil Uses You’ll Want to KnowFactableBrake For ItSay Goodbye: These Cars Will Be Discontinued In 2021Brake For ItMoneyWise.comMechanics Say You Should Avoid These Cars In 2021  MoneyWise.comDaily Funny40 Brilliant Life Hacks Nobody Told You AboutDaily FunnyLuxury SUVs | Search AdsThese Cars Are So Loaded It’s Hard to Believe They’re So CheapLuxury SUVs | Search AdsPost Fun25 Worst Movies Ever, According To Rotten TomatoesPost Funbonvoyaged.comYour IQ Is 142 If You Get 15/20 On This General Knowledge Quizbonvoyaged.com Also Read: Exclusive: The City’s hunger for success and willingness to push boundaries is infectious, says tech guru Additionally, many participants miss being part of a ‘physical’ cohort, going through experiences side-by-side with other participants. Serendipity really suffers in remote working – having those in-person chance meetings that lead to amazing collaborations are hard to quantify but vital for the community. There’s a reason small business and entrepreneurs have traditionally existed in clusters across the City. Their hunger for success and willingness to push boundaries is infectious, and being embedded in a community – sharing some of that competitive excitement – is the secret to unlocking new revenues and scaling opportunities. How important is innovation and entrepreneurship in our economic recovery? Also Read: Exclusive: The City’s hunger for success and willingness to push boundaries is infectious, says tech guru Also Read: Exclusive: The City’s hunger for success and willingness to push boundaries is infectious, says tech guru Share However, let’s remember that accelerators by their very nature are designed for spontaneous, in-person interaction. Inspiration – and subsequently innovation – are often spawned by face-to-face networking and chance meetings, which have been virtually non-existent over the last year or so. Jeremy Silver, CEO of Digital Catapult, a digital technology innovation firm based in Camden Town, has helped UK businesses small and large and across various industries to be more competitive online and to implement technological models, often bringing startups and more established businesses together. In reality, though, having the opportunities to bounce ideas, stories and expertise off others is what can take an idea from seed to market. Exposure to new experiences, environments and stimulating competition can help ignite creative sparks to make startups’ products or services a success. Also Read: Exclusive: The City’s hunger for success and willingness to push boundaries is infectious, says tech guru last_img read more

Richard Sackler, member of family behind OxyContin, was granted patent for addiction treatment

first_img Trending Now: A member of the family that owns Purdue Pharma — which is being sued by more than 1,000 jurisdictions for its alleged role in seeding the opioid crisis with its pain medication OxyContin — has been awarded a patent for a treatment for opioid use disorder.Dr. Richard Sackler is listed as one of six inventors on the patent, which was issued in January and was first reported Friday by the Financial Times. Critics told the FT that they were disturbed that the patent could enable Sackler to benefit financially from the addiction crisis that his family’s company is accused of fueling.Purdue has denied the allegations in the lawsuits, which also target a range of other opioid painkiller manufacturers and distributors.advertisement Toby Talbot/AP The patent concerns a new formulation of buprenorphine, one of the medications shown to help people with opioid addiction. It is already approved by the Food and Drug Administration in tablet and film form, but the patent describes a wafer that could dissolve even faster than existing forms when put under the tongue.The patent says that the faster the treatment dissolves, the less risk there is for diversion.advertisement BusinessRichard Sackler, member of family behind OxyContin, was granted patent for addiction treatment About the Author Reprints @DrewQJoseph [email protected] Andrew Joseph The man at the center of the secret OxyContin files Comparing the Covid-19 vaccines developed by Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson General Assignment Reporter Andrew covers a range of topics, from addiction to public health to genetics. The description in the patent warns that people who are addicted to drugs sometimes commit crimes to feed their habit, which is why it says improved forms of medication-assisted treatment are needed. Some of the lawsuits against Purdue and the other opioid companies have cited the public safety and law enforcement costs associated with addiction.The description of the patent says the form of buprenorphine could also be used to treat pain in people or animals.Purdue declined to comment on the patent.Separately, Purdue has been trying to show it is taking steps to address the addiction crisis. It has backed safer prescribing efforts and donated money to the National Sheriffs’ Association to purchase naloxone and train law enforcement on its use. This week, it contributed $3.4 million to a company working on a low-cost naloxone nasal spray. By Andrew Joseph Sept. 7, 2018 Reprints Sackler is the past president of Purdue; his father was one of three brothers who founded the company. The family has donated hundreds of millions of dollars to museums and schools and hospitals around the world, but has increasingly come under scrutiny amid the opioid crisis.In addition to the more than 1,000 lawsuits against Purdue from cities, state, counties, and tribes — most of which have been consolidated in an Ohio federal court — a case brought by Massachusetts recently named the Sackler family as defendants.Meanwhile, Congress has requested from Purdue a copy of a deposition from Sackler that was taken as part of a lawsuit brought by Kentucky against Purdue. The case was settled in 2015, but it is believed to be the only time a member of the Sackler family has been questioned under oath about the marketing of OxyContin and what the company knew about the addictive properties of the pain reliever.In a lawsuit in Kentucky, STAT has also sought to obtain a copy of the deposition. Related: Tags addictionbiotechnologydrug developmentopioidslast_img read more

Summer research opportunities for high school students should be available to all

first_imgLeave this field empty if you’re human: If summer research programs strive to excite and expose students to scientific research, questions that reward prior experience undermine their power to achieve this goal and restrict the pipeline of future scientists. I believe that programs should consider an applicant’s potential as a future scientist by including questions about work ethic, motivation, and curiosity, rather than focusing on questions regarding research interests, which can change over time.When I was in high school, my research interest focused on the development of calorie-burning brown fat, and how white fat might be manipulated to function like brown fat. Today, five years later, I’m interested in how a neuron establishes and maintains its individual combination of molecular features that distinguishes it from other neurons. While that may represent a large scientific about-face, the skills and confidence I gained during my high school research experiences have been a springboard for me to pursue undergraduate research and other opportunities on and off campus, like working with the Columbia Undergraduate Science Journal and interning at Genentech.In short, the benefits that can accrue from doing summer research during high school benefit students in their careers in the biosciences, whether that’s in medicine, academia, or industry.Given the persistent influence of high school summer research programs, I believe it’s high time to implement changes that broaden access to them. The National Institutes of Health continually reissues grant supplements to increase diversity in scientific research “throughout the continuum from high school to the faculty level.” Companies, foundations, and universities should fund programs that recruit high school students in ways that build a more inclusive pipeline of future scientists. That certainly serves the public interest, but it also benefits the organizations themselves by enlarging and diversifying the talent pool from which they will draw. Tags educationresearch HPREP, a program for underrepresented minority teens, helped me become a doctor For some high school students, an ideal summer is one spent on the beach with friends. For others, like me, an ideal summer is one spent hunched over a lab bench carrying out experiments. I had two such summers, which amplified my passion for science and profoundly motivated me in my studies. But I worry that this experience is denied to many who could learn and blossom from summer research opportunities.I first got the chance to do research the summer after my junior year in high school. It was part of a summer fellowship at the University of California, Irvine, Cancer Research Institute. The program was open only to students living in the county where the university is located, and offered no housing, transportation, or stipend. My family’s finances were solid enough that I could participate without having to worry about making money over the summer, and my parents were able to drive me to and from the lab.Every day that summer, I woke up excited to get to the lab. I studied the pattern of white blood cells in various layers of skin, trying to understand how they differed between day and night due to the body’s circadian rhythm. As I peered down the microscope’s eyepieces, the fluorescent cells fascinated me as they began to reveal the answers I sought. The excitement of discovery and the pride I felt in my results convinced me to seek out more opportunities for research.advertisement Newsletters Sign up for First Opinion A weekly digest of our opinion column, with insight from industry experts. About the Author Reprints Ultimately, the directors and administrators of high school summer research programs must create changes that will increase equity. They need to consider how to increase accessibility for more racially and economically diverse groups of students, in part by considering the real costs that participation in these programs entail.One high school summer research program in chemistry self-diagnosed these issues. Reporting in the Journal of Chemical Education, the program’s administrators concluded that the “fact that each student attending missed the opportunity to earn money from a summer job evidently discouraged students from the lower income class; an informal poll of our students showed them all to be from middle and upper income families.” That program took place in 1960; the report was published the following year.More than a half-century later, the system of summer research programs for high school students has perpetuated and, in some cases, heightened these inequities by failing to offer programs that recognize and respond to economic disparities and expanding programs that charge tuition.If we aspire to create a generation of scientists that is diverse in every sense, we must find ways to ensure that all of those high school students who prefer the lab bench to the beach can reap the benefits of summer research opportunities.Kenneth Pham is a senior biology major at Columbia University. He plans to work as a research assistant at Columbia and apply to a medical science training program that will lead to a combined M.D. and Ph.D. I realize just how fortunate I have been. Many high school students, including those with the same drive for science and research that I have, aren’t able to take advantage of opportunities for summer research because they can’t afford to do it. I am concerned that the valuable impact of summer research — immediate and future, personal and professional — is largely limited to the economically privileged.advertisement Related: My involvement in the UC Irvine program led to my taking part in another program the following summer. The benefits — confidence, skills, mentors, and more — rippled through my college years and will likely continue into the future as I start work next year as a research assistant and aim toward a career as a physician-scientist. By Kenneth Pham Nov. 12, 2018 Reprintscenter_img First OpinionSummer research opportunities for high school students should be available to all Privacy Policy Trending Now: [email protected] Adobe Comparing the Covid-19 vaccines developed by Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson It’s more than a worry, actually. During the 2017-2018 academic year, I was editor-in-chief of the Columbia Undergraduate Science Journal, which publishes the results of high school students’ research. To explore the backgrounds of the students who submitted articles for publication, I used as a proxy the average annual income of their neighborhoods. Their median neighborhood income, $111,497, was nearly double the national median.That makes sense when you consider that few summer research programs for high school students offer stipends, and some even charge for doing research — one costs more than $10,000 (which includes food and housing). A few ideal programs, like the Jackson Laboratory Summer Student Program and the George Washington Carver Internship Program at Iowa State University, provide room and board as well as generous stipends.If the majority of summer research programs for high school students don’t offer a complete package of support — housing, food, and a stipend — and some even charge tuition, these opportunities and the benefits that accrue from them will continue to be reaped by economically advantaged students who can afford to spend a summer in the lab.Economic issues aren’t the only barriers. Many summer research programs for high school students reward answers on applications that demonstrate access to and literacy of scientific research. That can deter applicants who have the drive to do research but who have not yet been immersed in science and the scientific literature. Please enter a valid email address. Kenneth Phamlast_img read more

WATCH: Portlaoise Tidy Towns group smash the Jerusalema Dance Challenge

first_img WATCH: Portlaoise Tidy Towns group smash the Jerusalema Dance Challenge The Jerusalema Dance Challenge has given us all a great laugh over the last few weeks – and we have another Laois effort here.Members of Portlaoise Tidy Towns swapped their litter pickers for their dancing sticks and got moving in a brilliant video.Shot by Nathan Booth, the dancing begins at Fitzmaurice Square in Portlaoise and continues over the World War I memorial. By Alan Hartnett – 10th March 2021 WhatsApp Twitter Pinterest Facebook Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Electric Picnic Home News Community WATCH: Portlaoise Tidy Towns group smash the Jerusalema Dance Challenge NewsCommunity Twitter Council Mary Sweeney elected Cathaoirleach of Portlaoise Municipal District for next 12 months Electric Picnic apply to Laois County Council for new date for this year’s festival Facebook WhatsApp “Others may have admired the beautiful artwork around the town, for example, the art that transforms the rectangular utility box into a stunning flower display (an enviable potting shed, if you wish) beside the railway bridge on the Mountmellick Road.“This Tuesday morning, however, a group from Portlaoise Tidy Towns stepped out to undertake a different kind of challenge, the Jeruselama Dance Challenge.“We met at Fitzmaurice Square at 10.30am with pickers and hi-vis jackets in place, but this time it was our feet that did all the work.“Eight brave novice dancers took on the challenge and with a few practice runs, got a reasonably good performance going.“Our esteemed Tidy Towns secretary, Vincent Booth, led the way in his ‘unusual’ attire, and his gifted son, Nathan, videoed the dance with the ease and patience of a true professional cameraman.“With some editing we knew he would have us all looking as though we’d been practicing this dance routine for hours – days, even.“We then moved to another site, the World War1 Memorial, which lists the local heroes among the total of 49,000 Irish fallen in what was to be the ‘war to end all wars’ and we paid tribute to all these brave men, including the grandfather of one of our members there.“Hopefully, people will appreciate the efforts of all those involved and perhaps remember that dropping litter on our streets or roadsides really isn’t a nice thing to do, as it spoils the look of our lovely environment for others.”You can check out the video by clicking here.SEE ALSO – Check out all of the other Jerusalema Dance Challenge efforts here TAGSJerusalema Dance ChallengePortlaoise Tidy Towns Electric Picnic One of the members of the group explained to LaoisToday how it all came about.They said: “Every Saturday morning, come hail rain or shine, members of Portlaoise Tidy Towns meet in Lyster Square and, armed with blue bags and litter-pickers, set out to clean up the unsightly litter that people casually drop on the streets.“In the summer months this group also meets on a Wednesday evening, while individuals head out whenever they have a spare few hours during the week to pick litter on the roads leading into the town.“This is voluntary work and for the most part, goes unheeded.“More observant pedestrians and road users may have noticed in recent times the wild flowerbeds, the street art that enhances those chunky bollards and the giant insect sculptures that grace the new roundabouts: that is also the work of Tidy Towns, with the aid of dedicated Council workers. Previous articleRemember the Game: Portlaoise down Ballinakill in U-17 hurling final 21 years agoNext articleIn Pictures: Laois school develop outdoor classroom and gardens Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. Pinterestlast_img read more

U.S. discount brokerage manipulates inexperienced investors, regulators say

first_img Regulators in Massachusetts claim Robinhood Financial targets and manipulates inexperienced investors and has failed to prevent costly outages on its popular stock trading platform.In an administrative complaint filed Wednesday by Secretary of the Commonwealth William Galvin, the state alleges that Robinhood violated securities laws by aggressively marketing itself to Massachusetts investors “without regard for the best interest of its customers,” while also failing to maintain a properly working platform as its number of users exploded. Stan ChoeAlex VeigaAssociated Press BMO’s adviceDirect launches premium service Family of novice investor who killed himself sue Robinhood Related news The complaint seeks an unspecified fine against Robinhood and an order requiring the company to hire an outside consultant to review its platform, infrastructure, and policies and procedures, among other penalties. Robinhood has nearly half a million customers in Massachusetts with accounts valued at more than $1.6 billion, according to the complaint.In a statement, the Menlo Park, California-based company said it disagrees with the complaint and intends to mount a vigorous defence.Galvin takes aim at how Robinhood does business, claiming the company uses “gamification strategies,” such as showering a user’s screen with virtual confetti every time they make a trade, to lure young people with little or no investment experience to trade stocks. The median age of a Robinhood customer is 31 and roughly 68% of the company’s customers in Massachusetts report having little or no trading experience, the state said.Galvin also asserts that the company, which earns revenue for trades executed by its customers, allows users to make a potentially unlimited number of trades without properly screening them to be approved for making certain types of riskier trades.“As a broker-dealer, Robinhood has a duty to protect its customers and their money,” Galvin said in a statement. “Treating this like a game and luring young and inexperienced customers to make more and more trades is not only unethical, but also falls far short of the standards we require in Massachusetts.”In its statement, Robinhood said it is “a self-directed broker-dealer and we do not make investment recommendations.”The state also claims the company’s infrastructure has failed to keep up with its growing customer base, resulting in frequent outages and disruptions that prevent investors from accessing their accounts. The company has experienced approximately 70 outages since the beginning of the year, including critical days for investors when the stock market has either surged or plunged, Galvin’s office said.The company said it has been working over the past several months to improve the platform’s performance and has added “safeguards and enhanced educational materials” about investing for its customers.Robinhood has drawn criticism and regulatory scrutiny in its drive to bring more regular people into investing, not just wealthy investors already well versed in the markets.A year ago, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority fined Robinhood $1.25 million after accusing it of not doing everything it should to find the best prices for customers trading stocks. Robinhood neither admitted nor denied the allegations in the settlement.Outside of the regulatory scrutiny, critics say Robinhood may be offering too much of a good thing. By making trading stocks and exchange-traded funds so cheap, easy and maybe even fun, it could be enabling unsophisticated investors to buy and sell too-risky investments too often.The company tells customers on its website that they can “level up with options trading,” for example. With options, investors buy a contract that gives them the possibility of buying or selling a stock or ETF in the future at a set price. Trading options allows for potentially big profits at a low initial cost, but it can also be riskier than buying a plain vanilla share of stock if the bet goes the wrong way. And if traders borrow money to juice their options trades, it raises the risk even more.The conventional wisdom is that holding on to investments for the long term typically proves to be the better play than trading often and trying to time the market. Consider this year, where the pandemic forced the market to go through years’ worth of action in the span of just a few months.All that volatility was lucrative for short-term investors who played it the right way. But anyone who simply held on to an S&P 500 index fund eventually got made whole after the market returned to record heights. The S&P 500 has recovered from every one of its setbacks in history, after being given enough time.Robinhood nevertheless has forced huge, ground-shaking changes for the brokerage industry. Its decision to charge zero commissions for customers trading stocks and exchange-traded funds pushed the industry’s biggest players to eventually follow suit — and to band together. Charles Schwab bought TD Ameritrade and Morgan Stanley acquired E-Trade Financial to try to be more competitive.Investors on Robinhood and other trading platforms have also influenced prices on Wall Street. Analysts credit these investors with helping drive shares in Tesla and other Big Tech companies sharply higher last summer while the economy struggled.Researchers have attributed some of Robinhood’s growth this year to people having a lot more time on their hands after coronavirus-caused lockdowns closed down the economy this past spring. The shutdown of sports leagues around the world also left many gamblers looking for something else to bet on. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Keywords Trading fees,  Discount brokerages Biden’s pick for SEC flags trading-app gimmicks for scrutiny man using laptop idofranz/iStock Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

Canada and Prince Edward Island invest in facilities at Mark Arendz Provincial Ski Park ahead of 2023 Canada Winter Games

first_imgCanada and Prince Edward Island invest in facilities at Mark Arendz Provincial Ski Park ahead of 2023 Canada Winter Games From: Infrastructure CanadaThe safety and well-being of Canadians are top priorities for the governments of Canada and Prince Edward Island. Investments in public infrastructure during this extraordinary time provide an opportunity to create jobs and economic growth, make our communities more sustainable and resilient in the face of climate change, and to build more inclusive, equitable public spaces.As Prince Edward Island is set to host the 2023 Canada Winter Games, strategic investments in sports and recreation facilities will play a key role in ensuring Islanders deliver a world-class event and create a sporting legacy for the province.Today, the Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities; the Honourable Wayne Easter, Member of Parliament for Malpeque; the Honourable Matthew MacKay, Minister of Economic Growth, Tourism and Culture; Wayne Carew, 2023 Canada Games Board Co-Chair, and Mark Arendz, 8-time Paralympic Medallist and 2023 Canada Games Board Member, announced funding to upgrade the Nordic Venue at the Mark Arendz Provincial Ski Park ahead of the 2023 Canada Winter Games.Athletes will benefit from upgrades to the ski trails, biathlon shooting range, start/finish stadium and penalty loop. Spectator’s experiences will be enhanced thanks to the construction of an accessible link between the lodge, stadium and a drop-off/pickup area. A new storage structure, and new team waxing building with washrooms will support events and maintenance operations. The lodge will be renovated and the existing timing building expanded to welcome competition guests and visitors.Once completed, this project will support athlete development and increase opportunities for competition sports and recreational activities for years to come. The new accessibility features will create a more inclusive facility for visitors at the 2023 Canada Winter Games and beyond.The Government of Canada is investing more than $1.5 million through the Community, Culture and Recreation Infrastructure stream of the Investing in Canada infrastructure program. The Government of Prince Edward Island is contributing over $1.5 million towards total eligible costs for this project.Quotes“Whether you are a competitive or recreational skier, these upgrades to the Mark Arendz Ski Park will serve Islanders for years to come. Athletes and visitors of the 2023 Canada Winter Games will get an incredible skiing experience, and the province gets an economic and sporting legacy it can continue to take pride in. Canada’s Infrastructure plan invests in thousands of projects, creates jobs across the country and builds cleaner, more inclusive communities.”The Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities“Island residents are looking towards the future and preparing to warmly welcome athletes and visitors for the 2023 Canada Winter Games. Enhancements to the Nordic Venue at the Mark Arendz Provincial Ski Park will ensure outdoor enthusiasts of all ages and abilities have a modern space to gather, and remain physically active for many years to come.”The Honourable Wayne Easter, Member of Parliament for Malpeque“The investments that we are making in the nordic venue at the Mark Arendz Provincial Ski Park will greatly benefit our province as we look ahead to the 2023 Canada Winter Games and beyond. Having a world-class facility here at home will provide our athletes with an incredible training ground as they prepare for the winter games while creating a sports and tourism legacy for our Island that will enhance the entire experience of our ski park for Islanders and visitors alike for years to come.”The Honourable Honourable Matthew MacKay, Minister of Economic Growth, Tourism and Culture“The original legacy from the 1991 Canada Winter Games still endures to this day. Without that legacy, the spark that ignited my passion for Biathlon would have never existed, and I would not have been able to accomplish what I have in Nordic skiing. Today’s announcement is a fantastic step forward in our vision of hosting the 2023 Canada Winter Games and inspiring the next generation of Canadian athletes. I look forward to welcoming all the athletes to the Island and cheering them on as dreams are achieved, greatness is inspired, and future champions are born.”Mark Arendz, 8-time Paralympic Medallist and 2023 Canada Games Board MemberQuick factsThrough the Investing in Canada infrastructure plan, the Government of Canada is investing more than $180 billion over 12 years in public transit projects, green infrastructure, social infrastructure, trade and transportation routes, and Canada’s rural and northern communities.$25.3 billion of this funding is supporting social infrastructure in Canadian communities.The Government of Canada has invested more than $365 million in over 132 infrastructure projects across Prince Edward Island under the Investing in Canada plan. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:building, Canada, climate, climate change, community, culture, future, Government, infrastructure, Minister, parliament, penalty, project, shooting, sustainable, tourismlast_img read more

Climate Change Commission Report – Action on climate change now urgent

first_imgClimate Change Commission Report – Action on climate change now urgent The Council of Trade Unions has today welcomed the release of the report of the Climate Change Commission Ināia tonu nei : a low emissions future for Aotearoa. The report shows that action is needed now to reduce the impact of climate change on our communities, our economy, and the most importantly the environment.“Action is needed now as delay is not only bad for the environment, but it also increases costs, reduces jobs, and makes the necessary transition more difficult in the future,” said CTU Director of Policy, Craig Renney.“We welcome the recognition in the report that creating a ‘just transition’ for future workforces that will be impacted both negatively and positively by the changes necessary. We agree that changes must be “co-designed with Iwi/Māori, local government, regional economic development agencies, working people, unions, businesses, and community groups with particular regard to those most disadvantaged”.“We would welcome support from government that would enable working people and their representatives to properly engage in the co-design process needed to implement the recommendations.”“We are pleased to see the recognition in the report the report that how we address climate change is also an opportunity to make our society more equal. Ensuring a fair and equal ‘just transition’ to climate friendly work and employment will require active engagement from working people and their unions.”“The government’s recent announcements around social insurance would be exactly the sort of policy that could support a more ‘just transition’ in the future. The governments work on Industry Transformation Plans and the reform of vocational education must also be tied into this work. We look forward to working constructively with the government on these important issues,” Renney said. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:climate change, Commission, community, Council of Trade Unions, director, disadvantaged, Economic Development, education, employment, environment, Government, industry, insurance, New Zealand, Society, trade union, vocational educationlast_img read more

Chelatchie Prairie Railroad offers Patriot’s Weekend Special Nov. 9 & 10

first_img guestLabel Chelatchie Prairie Railroad offers Patriot’s Weekend Special Nov. 9 & 10Posted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Wednesday, November 6, 2019in: Community News, Entertainment, Peopleshare 0 Trains will depart Saturday and Sunday at noon and 2:30 p.m. each dayYACOLT — The Chelatchie Prairie Railroad will operate Saturday & Sunday, Nov. 9 & 10, with the Patriot’s Weekend Special. The run will be a diesel excursion, through a 330-foot solid rock tunnel, to the Heisson area with a stop at Moulton Station to visit Yacolt Falls.The Chelatchie Prairie Railroad will operate Saturday & Sunday, Nov. 9 & 10, with the Patriot’s Weekend Special. The run will be a diesel excursion, through a 330-foot solid rock tunnel, to the Heisson area with a stop at Moulton Station to visit Yacolt Falls. Photo by Mike SchultzThe Chelatchie Prairie Railroad will operate Saturday & Sunday, Nov. 9 & 10, with the Patriot’s Weekend Special. The run will be a diesel excursion, through a 330-foot solid rock tunnel, to the Heisson area with a stop at Moulton Station to visit Yacolt Falls. Photo by Mike SchultzThe trains will depart each day at noon and 2:30 p.m. from the station in Yacolt. Guests are asked to please arrive 30 minutes prior to the scheduled departure to allow adequate time to pick up tickets and board the train.Tickets for this diesel run are $18 per person, $17 for military and seniors, $12 for children three to 12. Children up to the age of three are free. To purchase tickets and reserve your spot on this popular and scenic train ride, visit www.bycx.com for questions call (360) 686-3559. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyYacoltshare 0 Previous : New Winter hours established for community park gazebos and shelters Next : Lions Club vision screenings make sure children see clearlyAdvertisementThis is placeholder text Name*Email*Website I allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgree Name*Email*Websitecenter_img Subscribe Connect with LoginI allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgreeNotify of new follow-up comments new replies to my comments I allow to use my email address and send notification about new comments and replies (you can unsubscribe at any time). guestLabel 0 Comments Inline FeedbacksView all commentslast_img read more

CU-Boulder faculty member awarded science prize from Royal Swedish Academy

first_imgPeter Molnar Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail University of Colorado Boulder Professor Peter Molnar has been awarded the prestigious 2014 Crafoord Prize in Geosciences by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for his groundbreaking research in geophysics and geological sciences.Molnar, a professor in geological sciences and fellow of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, was honored for his contributions to the understanding of global plate tectonics, including the deformation of continents and the structure and evolution of mountain ranges. He also was cited for his research on the impact of tectonic processes on ocean-atmosphere circulation and climate.The $620,000 prize is awarded annually by the Royal Swedish Academy to honor achievements in fields not covered by its better known Nobel Prizes. The Crafoord Prize covers the disciplines of astronomy, mathematics, geosciences and biosciences as a complement to the Nobel Prize disciplines. Only one Crafoord Prize is awarded annually by the academy, on a rotating basis by discipline.“Professor Peter Molnar has been well known for many years in the international science community for his exceptional work in the field of geosciences,” said CU-Boulder Vice Chancellor for Research Stein Sture. “We take great pride as a university when any of our faculty members are recognized for excellence by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and we congratulate Peter for his first-rate contributions to the global research community.”Molnar is considered by many to be an expert on the driving forces behind Earth’s plate motions. He has combined geological and geophysical methods with satellite measurements and modeling techniques to provide a new understanding of the formation of mountain ranges and their role in global tectonics. He currently is studying how geological changes in Tibet have affected Asian climate, including the Asian monsoon.Much of Molnar’s research has involved the continental collision between India and Eurasia in the south Asian region, a process that has been occurring for roughly 50 million years and one that involves frequent, large earthquakes in the Himalayas and Tibet.In addition, Molnar has used an interdisciplinary approach in studying the processes of Earth’s crust and mantle, including their influence on climate. His contributions have helped scientists better understand ocean current circulation and its influence on regional and global climate, as well as earthquake risks in the southern Himalayas.The May 6 Crafoord Prize ceremony at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences will be attended by Swedish King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia. The Crafoord Prize was established in 1980 by Holger Crafoord, a Swedish industrialist, and his wife Anna-Greta Crafoord.  CIRES is a joint venture between CU-Boulder and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. For more information on Molnar’s research visit http://cires.colorado.edu/science/groups/molnar/projects/. For more information on CIRES visit http://cires.colorado.edu/index.html.Contact: Peter [email protected] Katy Human, CIRES media relations, [email protected] Jim Scott, CU-Boulder media relations, [email protected] Categories:AcademicsScience & TechnologyEnvironmentCampus CommunityNews Headlinescenter_img Published: Jan. 16, 2014 “Professor Peter Molnar has been well known for many years in the international science community for his exceptional work in the field of geosciences,” said CU-Boulder Vice Chancellor for Research Stein Sture. “We take great pride as a university when any of our faculty members are recognized for excellence by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and we congratulate Peter for his first-rate contributions to the global research community.”last_img read more

Scott Laboratories’ Enology Department Announces Promotions and Additions to Their Fermentation…

first_imgFacebook ReddIt Email Share TAGSAnnamarie HowardAshlie HelmDr. Nichola HallElla BeckEric MohsenScott Laboratories Twitter Linkedin Previous articleFrancis Ford Coppola Winery Launches Pool House WinesNext articleAckerman Family Vineyards Names Kristie Fondario General Manager Press Release Home Industry News Releases Scott Laboratories’ Enology Department Announces Promotions and Additions to Their Fermentation &…Industry News ReleasesWine BusinessScott Laboratories’ Enology Department Announces Promotions and Additions to Their Fermentation & Enology TeamBy Press Release – June 9, 2021 292 0 AdvertisementPetaluma, CA – June 2021 – Since 1933, Scott Labs has supported the wine and specialty  beverage industry with trusted experts and are continuing that tradition with new hires and  changes to their Fermentation & Enology Department. “We are fiercely dedicated to providing the  best product and process know-how to the winemaking community and our team makes this  possible,” commented Jessica Just, General Manager of Scott Labs’ Fermentation & Enology  Department. Eric Mohseni, a 22-year winemaking veteran of the Central Coast, joined the team in March as a  Technical Sales Representative. From Cambria, Eric supports Scott Labs on the Central Coast  along with Ronnie Hahn and brings a wealth of practical winemaking knowledge to the group. Annamarie “Onnie” Howard moved back to the North Bay after being on the Central Coast  since 2015. She joined Scott Labs in 2004 with an impressive resume in wine, making her an  invaluable asset to the team and the industry. She is Scott Labs’ resident malolactic fermentation  expert and was the first to launch direct inoculation malolactic bacteria in North America. Onnie is extremely excited to connect with winemakers in the North Bay as a Technical Sales Representative for Fermentation & Enology. Another exciting promotion rounds out the California sales team; Ashlie Helm has been  appointed key account manager in the Central Valley and Sierra Foothills. She is an alumna of  the Viticulture & Enology program at University of California, Davis, where she earned her B.S.  degree. With a strong background in winemaking and many years as part of Scott Labs’ sales  team, Ashlie is perfectly positioned to take on this role. Ella Beck is the Content Specialist for the Fermentation & Enology Department at Scott  Laboratories. She joins the team in a new position created specifically to take the experience and  knowledge of its team members and translate that know-how into educational resources for the  wine & beverage industry. With a degree in Viticulture and Enology from U.C. Davis, Ella worked  in wineries in Oregon and Napa Valley before finding Scott Labs. Finally, Dr. Nichola Hall has been promoted to Technical Director for the Fermentation &  Enology Department. Dr. Hall hails from Scotland where she earned an undergraduate degree in  Microbial Biotechnology and a PhD in Yeast Physiology. She is Scott Labs’ resident yeast and  yeast nutrient expert and directs the technical information for the Fermentation & Enology  portfolio. Nichola is an ASEV past president and past Co-Chair of the Unified Wine & Grape  Symposium.About Scott Laboratories For over 80 years, Scott Labs has been the leading supplier for the North American wine and  specialty beverage industry, providing fermentation products, filtration media, equipment, cork  and packaging solutions. Scott Labs has been embedded in the wine community since 1933  where their story starts at the University of California, just days prior to the end of Prohibition.  Scott Labs’ vision is to provide the best customer experience to the specialty beverage community. Their mission is to advance the long-term success of the specialty beverage  community by providing best-in-class products and services. They believe in education, honesty,  and doing the right thing.Advertisement Pinterestlast_img read more