Singapore sovereign wealth fund takes stake in Railpool

first_imgRAILPOOL: Singapore’s sovereign wealth fund GIC has taken a 49% stake in München-based electric locomotive leasing company Railpool, joining funds managed by Oaktree Capital Management.Railpool is ‘a high quality business with a strong track record and a proven business model’, said Stuart Baldwin, Head of Infrastructure at GIC. Founded in 2008, it currently leases 140 locomotives to various European operators and has another 40 on order.Railpool said the deal would enable it to enter into new business areas and selectively make acquisitions. ‘We are confident that we are now ideally positioned to capture the full potential the rolling stock leasing market offers’, said CEO Torsten Lehnert. ‘Oaktree gave us the possibility to upgrade our operations and successfully grow our business while the additional investment of GIC is now securing the continuation of locomotive fleet expansion as well as investing in other growth markets.’last_img

Dumfries Camera Obscura Ceberates 180th Birthday

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInDumfries Camera Obscura, the oldest working example of its type in the world, is celebrating its 180th birthdayMoving images projected onto a white table in a dark room at the top of the iconic windmill tower were first enjoyed by audiences in 1836. Today this pre-Victorian invention still fascinates visitors of all ages from all over the world.On Monday 1 August 2016, weather permitting, Dumfries Museum is celebrating the Camera Obscura’s 180th birthday by offering Camera Obscura showings at the original 1836 price of sixpence.Councillor Tom McAughtrie, chairman of the Communities committee, said, “The camera obscura in the old windmill tower is a famous landmark and something that Dumfries can be proud of. Many local people and visitors have fond memories of visiting Dumfries Museum and climbing the spiral staircase to see the camera obscura in action. It offers a unique way to see our town and the beautiful landscapes surrounding it.”The windmill tower was built in the late 18th century. The town already had water mills on the west bank of the River Nith, driven by water power from the caul. These mills were housed in the building which is now the Robert Burns Centre. The windmill was an additional method of grinding the town’s grain. It operated for several decades, but by the 1830s it had become redundant.It was purchased by Dumfries and Maxwelltown Astronomical Society and converted into an astronomical observatory. Raising their funds from the subscriptions of members, the society arranged for adaptations to the building and purchased a telescope and a camera obscura from the Kilmarnock instrument maker, Thomas Morton. In 1836 the observatory was opened.Lord Cockburn, a Scottish lawyer, judge and literary figure, visited Dumfries in 1939 and wrote in his journal:21st September 1839The old windmill has been converted into what they call an Observatory; which means a windmill- looking tower, with a bit of shrubbery round it, ginger-beer in the ground floor, a good telescope in the second storey, and a camera obscura in the third. So the astronomical dignity of the establishment is not great, but still it is an agreeable and civilised institution. The views of the neighbouring country are beautiful, and there are few better positions for a camera.So, how does the Camera Obscura work? A wooden turret revolves on an iron ratchet wheel at the very top of the building. If you look carefully you can see this happening from the museum gardens. Within this turret is a mirror which can be tilted by a pulley rope to reflect its image downward through a lens, onto a white plaster topped table about 12 feet below in a totally darkened room. A real life, panoramic view of the town of Dumfries and its surrounding countryside can be seen. On a clear day you can see from Corsencon, near New Cumnock in Ayrshire, down to Coniston Old Man, amongst the Lakeland Fells – mountain peaks over 80miles apart. Even in the high tech days of the 21st Century, the effect is still magical.When the Camera Obscura is in use its mirror and lens are exposed to the open air which is why it cannot be used when the weather is wet. Providing the weather is favourable on Monday 1 August, visitors will be able to view the Camera Obscura between 10am and 5pm (1000 and 1700). And, just as in Lord Cockburn’s day, traditional ginger beer and lemonade will be available for thirsty visitors who have climbed Observatory Hill to reach the museum.During the summer Dumfries Museum and Camera Obscura is open Monday to Saturday 10am to 5pm (1000 to 1700) and Sundays 2pm to 5pm (1400to 1700). Entry to the museum is free. Camera Obscura presentations normally cost £3 (concessions £1.50).last_img read more

UNHCR steps up COVID-19 prevention measures for refugees in Africa

first_imgAfrica on high alert amid COVID-19 outbreak Stringent measures announced to tackle COVID-19 in S. Africa South Sudanese refugees practice social distancing as they wait to access a food distribution at Kakuma camp in Kenya. © UNHCR/Samuel Otieno South Sudanese refugees practice social distancing as they wait to access a food distribution at Kakuma camp in Kenya. © UNHCR/Samuel OtienoUNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, is ramping up efforts to increase capacity to prevent the potential spread of COVID-19 among refugee communities across Africa.To date there have been no confirmed cases amongst refugees, asylum-seekers or internally displaced people in the region,but the need to be prepared is urgent, says UNHCRThe refugee body is actively engaged with Ministries of Health and other government authorities, and the World Health Organization, on the inclusion of refugees, asylum-seekers and internally displaced people (IDPs) in national response plans.A number of countries in the region already have exemplary policies in place that allow refugees to access public health-care services.The pandemic is having a severe impact on refugees’ abilities to work and generate income. Many refugees have seen the business they run or work for, often as day workers, forced to close. Those who rely on cross-border trade have been particularly impacted.UNHCR is also advocating to governments to ensure refugees are included in any emergency social protection schemes, while also exploring possibilities to provide the most vulnerable with one-off cash assistance to help meet basic needs.The outbreak comes on the top of existing emergency conditions in the region, where 60 per cent of refugees are experiencing food ration cuts due to underfunding.Relatedcenter_img COVID-19 death toll in Africa reaches 83last_img read more

Ghana extends COVID-19 restrictions for 3 months

first_imgGhana announces 470 new COVID-19 infections Ghana’s COVID-19 cases pass 19,000 Nana Akufo-Addo, President of Ghana, delivers the Keynote Address, at the National Governors Association’s (NGA) Winter Meeting, at the JW Marriott in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, February 25, 2018.(Photo by Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images) Nana Akufo-Addo, President of Ghana, delivers the Keynote Address, at the National Governors Association’s (NGA) Winter Meeting, at the JW Marriott in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, February 25, 2018.(Photo by Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images)Ghanaian President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo announced late Sunday a three-month extension of multiple restrictions to strengthen the country’s fight against the COVID-19 pandemic.During a live TV broadcast, Akufo-Addo said the restrictions include the wearing of face masks, the closures of public places such as beaches and cinemas, and land borders.The president called for the public to abide by the social distancing rules to avoid a spike in the number of infections.“We cannot afford, at this critical moment, to throw caution to the wind and destroy the incredible amount of work by the government, health officials, heroic frontline workers, and security agencies in bringing us this far,” he said.Currently, Ghana has recorded 46,004 COVID-19 cases with 297 deaths, according to the country’s health ministry.Relatedcenter_img Ghana confirms nine new COVID-19 caseslast_img read more

UWF Men’s Basketball Announces 2016-17 Schedule

first_img“The makeup and flow of our schedule is good,” said UWF men’s basketball head coach Jeff Burkhamer. “I like the fact we never play more than three consecutive games on the road before returning to the UWF Field House. We have a terrific homestand in January where we get to play four of five contests in Pensacola.” 2017 begins with a home contest against North Alabama on Monday, Jan. 2 at 7:30 p.m. West Florida’s January schedule features a jam-packed nine games, including five home games. The first round of the Gulf South Conference tournament is February 28th at the higher seed’s facility. The remainder of the tournament will take place at Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama. UWF opens the year at Louisiana-Lafayette on Thursday, Nov. 3 at 7:00 p.m. CST. West Florida will jump into Division II play on Friday, Nov. 11 in Fort Valley, Georgia against Albany State. PENSACOLA, Fla. – The UWF men’s basketball is set to begin the second year of the Jeff Burkhamer era in the 2016-17 season, beginning on November 3, 2016. The squad anticipates an upcoming schedule which features an exhibition against Division I Louisiana-Lafayette and six other nonconference matchups. “We are excited about the 2016-17 season,” said Burkhamer. “We changed the culture and set the foundation last season. Now we are ready to take the next step as we work to build a winner at UWF.” The UWF Field House will see its first action of the year on Saturday, Nov. 19 at 6:00 p.m. against Auburn Montgomery. November features a total of six games, including four road contests and two home games. UWF will welcome defending GSC Tournament champions West Georgia on Jan. 14, 2017 at 4:00 p.m. 2016-17 SCHEDULE Nearing the end of the season in February, UWF will play a total of nine games in a four-week span. Eight of nine contests are against GSC opponents, and UWF will play Auburn-Montgomery for the second time in the 2016-17 season on Feb. 20, 2017. After a road contest against Spring Hill on Nov. 30, UWF will take a 12-day break until hosting Valdosta State for its Gulf South Conference opener on Monday, Dec. 12. The Argos will play two road games after, before taking a two-week long holiday break. UWF has a marquee matchup with 2016 NCAA South Regional participant Alabama Huntsville on New Year’s Eve at 2:00 p.m. December features four contests, divided evenly between two home games and two road games. — GoArgos.com — Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

The Coach Shinnick Show – October 10

first_imgPrint Friendly Version This week on the show, our host Tommy Thrall and #UWFFootball head coach Pete Shinnick recap a win over North Alabama and preview our upcoming Homecoming matchup against No. 5 West Georgia. We also meet running back Chris Schwarz, #UWFWSOC freshman sensation Peyton Peffers, and look at a big week of Argo athletics. #GoArgoslast_img

It’s Not Too Late to Find Polling Locations

first_imgFenumiai: “Well they can go to our website, www.elections.alaska.gov and right on the home page there is a link to a list of polling places and they can click on their district link and then go down and it will show a list of polling places. There are also several polling place look-up tools online that you can access, you can enter your information and it will tell you name and location of your polling place. We also have a toll free polling place locator, the number is 1-888-383-8683 they can call that and enter in their voter number or social security number, some kind of identifying information that’s personal to that voter and it will tell them where the polling place is.” Division of Elections Executive Director Gail Fenumiai… FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享For any Kenai Peninsula residents just getting off work there is still time to find your polling location to vote in the general election before 8 pm.last_img

This Winter’s Fluctuating Temperatures Cause Increased Pot Holes

first_imgOther phone numbers for local road maintenance: She says workers accompanying mobile maintenance operations appreciate when drivers slow down and approach their work zones slowly and carefully. Shannon McCarthy with the Department of Transportation says more reports of damaged asphalt have been received this year. FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The constant freezing and thawing most of Alaska has seen this winter is taking its toll on roads in the form of more pot holes forming. McCarthy gave a couple other tips to avoiding trouble with pot holes. She says Kenai Peninsula residents can report pot holes they notice to the local maintenance shop by calling 262-2199. McCarthy: “If we get any kind of water that penetrates the asphalt, it goes to the sub-base and can create problems and then the asphalt becomes a little bit more flexible because there’s a little bit of a void underneath. So of course, flexible asphalt is not good because it’ll crack and break and chunks will start coming up and that creates a pot hole.” City of Kenai Road Maintenance:                            283-8254 City of Soldotna Road Maintenance:                     262-4672 McCarthy: “If they see a puddle, or standing water on the road, we really encourage people to slow down. Don’t go through those large puddles at highway speed because there’s very likely road damage underneath. We want people to slow down and proceed with caution. And then if they do see the crews out working with the mobile work sites, we just want them to give them a little bit of space to do their work so they can fill those pot holes.” Kenai Peninsula Borough Road Service Area:   262-4427last_img read more

USA Gymnastics sues insurance carriers amid Nassar lawsuits

first_imgThe Indianapolis Star reported that USA Gymnastics accuses the insurers of breach of contract and alleges they haven’t provided a full defense or fully reimbursed it for defense costs in 10 lawsuits filed by women who say Nassar abused them.Nassar worked for USA Gymnastics for 29 years and also worked at Michigan State University, which is named in many of the lawsuits.The women’s lawsuits accuse USA Gymnastics of failing to protect athletes from Nassar’s abuse.USA Gymnastics has denied those and other allegations. KEYWORDS IN FIVE EASY PIECES WITH TAKE 5 USA Gymnastics is suing its insurance carriers, alleging that they haven’t fully reimbursed it for defense costs incurred in lawsuits filed by victims of disgraced former sports doctor Larry Nassar.The Indianapolis-based governing body for gymnastics sued seven insurance companies Friday in Marion County.center_img lawsuit, USA Gymnastics, Larry Nassar GET THE BEST OF THE JAPAN TIMESlast_img

DNR Approves Furie Operating Plan For 2019

first_imgThe company says that they’ve completed a number of repair and maintenance tasks to the Julius R platform, which Furie is operating the Spartan 151 jack-up rig. The company intends to bring the number of gas-producing wells on the unit to four. The KLU is an 83,394-acre unit divided into four blocks: Corsair, North, Southwest, and Central Blocks.Originally, the Division approved formation of the Kitchen Unit on January 31, 2007, and later theexpansion and renaming of the Kitchen Unit to the Kitchen Lights Unit on June 30, 2009. Furie submitted the Kitchen Lights Unit – Sixth Plan of Development to the DNR on October 5. The Kitchen Lights Unit is located in the Northern Cook Inlet.center_img Furie states that it “intends to continue exploration drilling throughout the KLU, including outside theCorsair Block,” and that by February 2019 “it will mature two prospects for exploration wells outside theCorsair Block and present them to DNR along with evidence that commercially reasonable efforts areunderway to drill these wells in either 2019 or 2020.” FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Furie is pressing forward with exploration in the Cook Inlet after their operating plan for 2019 was approved by the Alaska Department of Natural Resources.last_img read more