Swimmers perfect their stroke at township club

first_imgBY WARREN RAPPLEYEAStaff Writer BY WARREN RAPPLEYEA Staff Writer With more than 60 swimmers in the program, coach Jean Marie Gillen is working to build a strong team for the future at the Hazlet Swim and Tennis Club. “The main things are for everyone to become a better swimmer and to have some fun,” said Gillen, now in her seventh-year at the helm for the Hazlet club, which is now managed by the Community YMCA in Red Bank. “Their times are dropping and their strokes are improving. That’s very encouraging.” The team’s top swimmers in the girls competition are: (8 years old and under) Tara Anderson, Erin Finn, Samantha Ferrigno and Jamie McHarg; (9-10) Megan Lunney, Kristen McGowan, and Maggie and Regina Santora; (11-12) Salina Catani, Briann Lentine and Alexis Walsh; (13-14) Helen McDonald, twins Holly and Heather Miara, and Kim Renna; and (15-18) Lorraine Costello, Jessica McLean, Katie Miller and Adrienne Pannullo. Costello also serves as an assistant coach. On the boys side, the competitors include: (eight years old and under) Ryan Kelly, Brian Lazicki and Cassidy Tripolitis; (9-10) Joseph McCarthy, Freddie McDonald and Colin McHarg; (11-12) Mario Ferrigno, T.J. Miara, Matt Roomey and Andrew Walunas; (13-14) Richie DeMarco and Joe Pannullo; and (15-18) Eric Bachmann, Danny Dunphy and John Renna. Dunphy is an assistant coach as well. Although the team has struggled at times in meets, Gillen said all of the Hazlet swimmers have worked hard. The team has two meets remaining. “We have a great group of kids and I really enjoy working with them,” Gillen said. “They want to learn and they always give their best.”last_img read more

London’s Wembley stadium to host climax of Euro 2020

first_imgBy Martyn HermanUEFA president Michel Platini’s vision of a European Championship spread across the continent came to fruition on Friday as London’s Wembley Stadium was chosen to host the climax of Euro 2020 with 12 other cities joining the party.The 90,000-seater Wembley, rebuilt from 2003 to 2007 and venue of the 2011 and 2013 Champions League finals, will stage both semi-finals and the final of the 60th anniversary tournament dubbed a “Euro for Europe”.It will be the first time in the competition’s history when a tournament will be hosted by more than two countries.Wembley got the nod over Munich’s Allianz Arena, the other stadium initially bidding for semi-finals and final hosting rights. Munich had to make do with being one of 12 cities awarded one of the standard packages, comprising three group matches and a knockout round tie.The home of Bayern Munich will host a quarter-final, along with the Baku Olympic Stadium in Azerbaijan, Rome’s Olympic Stadium and the Zenit Arena in St Petersburg, Russia.Last 16 ties will take place in Copenhagen, Amsterdam, Bucharest, Dublin, Bilbao, Budapest, Brussels and Glasgow.Cardiff’s Millennium Stadium along with bids from Stockholm, Skopje, Jerusalem, Sofia and Minsk were all rejected.The vote for Wembley comes as a welcome tonic for the Football Association after its failed bids to host the 2006 and 2018 World Cup finals but FA chairman Greg Dyke denied any deal had been done with their German counterparts, the DFB.“There is no deal,” Dyke told reporters at the ceremony in Geneva. “Other than we will not bid (to stage) Euro 2024 because it would be a waste of time because we wouldn’t get it.”Dyke, however, hinted that England would support a German bid to host the 2024 tournament.DFB president Wolfgang Niersbach, whose federation are believed to have pulled out from trying to host final and semi-final games with an eye on a 2024 bid, said: “I am very satisfied and happy that we could convince UEFA with our bid and have in 2020, after 32 years, European championship games again in Germany.”England has hosted only one major tournament since the 1966 World Cup, the much-praised Euro 96, the final of which between Germany and the Czech Republic was played at the former Wembley.“It’s nice to win one,” Dyke said. “Wembley is a great stadium and we are delighted to be hosting the finals of this tournament. Wembley has been completely rebuilt since 96 and it’s now a beautiful stadium.“I would also like to say what a good idea this is when you sit and watch all these capital cities across Europe, what a good idea to play a tournament across all those, so congratulations to UEFA.”“This bidding process was open to more than 50 UEFA countries so for Wembley to be ultimately recognised in this way is testament to a lot of hard work behind the scenes,” Dyke added on the FA website.“It will be a great honour to be part of what will surely be a superb celebration of 60 years of the European Championship.”Dublin’s inclusion in the tournament coincides with the Football Association of Ireland’s 100th anniversary.“This one off opportunity to host part of the European finals at our home stadium will provide a major boost for Irish football and the country as a whole,” FAI chief John Delaney said in a statement.There was relief too for Russia, given the current conflict near its border with Ukraine.“I want to congratulate all supporters of Russian Football,” Russian Minister for Sport Vitaly Mutko said.“Of course, there was a chance that because of the current political situation, the powers would refuse to let us host matches at Euro 2020. But we are really happy that the world of sport and politics are kept separate.”The choice of Rome’s Olympic Stadium for a quarter-final match, follows on from Thursday’s UEFA announcement that Milan’s San Siro would be the venue for the 2016 Champions League final.Football Federation president Carlo Tavecchio said it showed the country is making strides after years battling problems with hooliganism and crumbling stadia.“From a sporting perspective our intention is to consolidate the international dimension of Italian football, contribute to the renewal of our stadiums and support the growth of the football movement, in particular at grass roots level,” he said.No French cities will be used although France is hosting the next finals in 2016.last_img read more

Transforming Health Care for Mothers and Babies in the Former Soviet Union

first_imgPosted on August 27, 2012Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Our colleagues at JSI recently published a document that describes recent changes and improvements in maternal and infant health care across several countries in the former soviet union. The document, Transforming Health Care for Mothers and Babies in the Former Soviet Union, also outlines JSI’s role in supporting changes in the health systems of these countries.According the JSI’s website, “This document presents the ways in which improvements were introduced and scaled up, the quantitative impact they have had on the health and survival of mothers and newborns and on health systems, and stories from families and health workers whose lives have been immeasurably enriched by the modern, humane and evidence-based methods of care brought by the projects.”More about the report:The changes have contributed to reduced postpartum hemorrhage and other conditions that underlie maternal death as well as to reduced newborn hypothermia and asphyxia, reflected in declines in indicators such as early neonatal mortality. The changes also fostered increases in contraceptive use that helped reduce reliance on abortion. Beyond that, JSI has empowered women, families, health care providers and health administrators to take the initiative to improve health services in their communities.Starting in 1999, with USAID funding, JSI supported the governments of Russia, Ukraine, Georgia and the five Central Asian Republics – Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan – to launch pilot projects to improve maternal and infant care and reduce maternal and infant morbidity and mortality and then roll out successful interventions. A little over a decade later, the region’s maternal and infant health care systems are stronger than before.Learn more about the report here.Download the report here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more