Grey believes he’s perfect fit for Bolts

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Meralco Bolts’ Draft pick Jonathan Grey. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netJonathan Grey doesn’t mind dropping down to seventh in the first round of the 2016 PBA Rookie Draft, opting to look at the bright side as he joins a promising Meralco crew.“Hindi ko iniisip yun. Sa akin, mula pa lang nung start, ang dream ko naman ay ma-draft lang. Basta sa akin, masayang-masaya ako na na-draft ako,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Donaire-Magdaleno headlines stacked PacVargas undercard EDITORS’ PICK View comments Grey was expected to fare among the top half of the regular draft. But despite the surprise drop, the former St. Benilde scorer believes he fits perfectly with Meralco.“Sobrang fit ako sa team,” Grey noted, acknowledging the Bolts’ need to shore up in the wing position.“Excited ako kasi makakasama ko sa practice yung players ng Meralco.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentThough he doesn’t want to get too caught up with the expectations, Grey just vowed to do his best for the Bolts this coming season.“Gagawin ko yung best ko pag nag-start na yung practice. Alam naman natin kung gaano ka-grabe yung teamwork ng team nila. Excited ako talaga ako dahil marami akong matutunan, lalo na sa veterans nila. Sobrang excited ako talaga,” he said. 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports PH among economies most vulnerable to virus BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town MOST READ Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND We are young Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908last_img read more

PBA D-League: Chongson says Brickman worth the gamble for Tanduay

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. EDITORS’ PICK MOST READ PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Senators to proceed with review of VFA Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports PBA D-League: AMA coach hopes Teng’s arrival helps bring team to semis Chongson sees the selection as a gamble, with Brickman’s commitment still uncertain this conference.“Fifty-fifty. I’m not surprised some teams are scared of complications with his papers. But what surprised me is that no one tried to gamble on him,” he said.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad Ali“I picked him at the fourth round, so it’s harmless.”Still, Chongson hopes that the gamble will bear fruit for the Rhum Masters. Fil-American guards Jason Brickman and Kris Rosales defending each other. Photo by Kuk Thew/ABLTanduay coach Lawrence Chongson anticipated that somehow, Jason Brickman will fall into his lap.And the Fil-Am guard did, as the Rhum Masters plucked the former ABL standout in the fourth round in the 2016 PBA D-League Draft on Tuesday.ADVERTISEMENT Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine We are young Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town View comments As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Regardless of what Brickman and Tanduay will agree upon, he sees the former Finals MVP for Westports Malaysia Dragons as a sleeper pick.“It’s like getting a gift on Christmas day. If in the next day, his papers arrive then I’ll get ‘pogi points’ from my boss.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PHlast_img read more

The Great Insect Dying: How to save insects and ourselves

first_imgThe entomologists interviewed for this Mongabay series agreed on three major causes for the ongoing and escalating collapse of global insect populations: habitat loss (especially due to agribusiness expansion), climate change and pesticide use. Some added a fourth cause: human overpopulation.Solutions to these problems exist, most agreed, but political commitment, major institutional funding and a large-scale vision are lacking. To combat habitat loss, researchers urge preservation of biodiversity hotspots such as primary rainforest, regeneration of damaged ecosystems, and nature-friendly agriculture.Combatting climate change, scientists agree, requires deep carbon emission cuts along with the establishment of secure, very large conserved areas and corridors encompassing a wide variety of temperate and tropical ecosystems, sometimes designed with preserving specific insect populations in mind.Pesticide use solutions include bans of some toxins and pesticide seed coatings, the education of farmers by scientists rather than by pesticide companies, and importantly, a rethinking of agribusiness practices. The Netherlands’ Delta Plan for Biodiversity Recovery includes some of these elements. In recent months a debate over whether a global insect apocalypse is underway has raged in the mainstream media and among researchers. To assess the range of scientific opinion, Mongabay interviewed 24 entomologists and other scientists working on six continents, in more than a dozen countries, to better determine what we know, what we don’t, and most importantly — what we should do about it. This is part 4 of a four part exclusive series written by Mongabay senior contributor Jeremy Hance. Click on the following links to read part 1, part 2, and part 3.They formed the unlikeliest of survey teams: in 2017, University of Reno entomologist Lee Dyer, graduate student Danielle Salcido, and executives from some of the world’s biggest banks spent a week roughing it at a gathering facilitated by the Earthwatch Institute. The team chatted, laughed, hiked and scrounged the coniferous forests of Arizona’s Chiricahua National Forest hunting for bugs.At night, the researchers gave presentations about the impacts of global warming on insect populations. On the last day, a researcher offered a talk on the value of native plantings around homes — a message that really connected.“They loved that talk; discussion ensued, and they left with excitement to plant native trees in their yards,” says Salcido. But she worries whether this small-scale solution undercut a week’s worth of messaging to get these powerful people to comprehend the links between a rapidly warming world, plummeting insect populations, and the impacts both may have on ecosystems and civilization.“I was disappointed they left thinking we can solve these complicated global issues by planting a tree,” she says. “In their minds ‘doing their part’ was so distilled and small-scale; I realized that when many people are giving honest efforts to do their part, they are naïve [as] to how much change that will bring about.”last_img read more