Premier League wage row risks undermining good work

first_imgThe British government’s Culture Secretary, whose department has responsibility for sport, warned that the game should be “thinking very carefully about their next steps”, as the row over player wage cuts rumbles on.The Premier League, the most lucrative football league in the world, has been suspended for a month and the clubs have asked players and managers to take a 30% cut in pay.Writing in the Telegraph newspaper, Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden said the stand-off between the PFA and the league on wage cuts was “deeply concerning, especially at a time when more clubs have announced they are furloughing many of their lowest paid staff.”Premier League leaders Liverpool announced on Saturday that they would be using the government’s job retention scheme to pay for some non-playing staff, following similar decisions from Tottenham Hotspur, Newcastle United and Norwich City.“Leaving the public purse to pick up the cost of furloughing low paid workers, whilst players earn millions and billionaire owners go untouched is something I know the public will rightly take a very dim view of,” wrote Dowden.“At a time of national crisis, our national sport must play its part. I expect to see the football authorities judge the mood of the country and come together with an agreement urgently,” he added.The players’ union, the Professional Footballers’ Association (PFA), has yet to agree to a cut and argued after a meeting with the Premier League on Saturday that reduced wages would lower tax revenue for the National Health Service.The PFA’s chief executive Gordon Taylor said on Monday players want to know where their money is going, and suggested foreign footballers were keener to send their wages back to their home countries to aid the fight against the virus.“We have so many foreign players who come to this country and they know what it says on the contract they will get, which has not always been the case with them at times in different areas of the world,” Taylor told Sky Sports News.“A lot of them also want to help out with their own countries and their own families and looking after their families and friends, the same as the players here.“So they want a choice if their money is being affected, where that money is going, rather than it being imposed.”Former England captain Wayne Rooney says he is happy to offer support but asked: “Why are footballers suddenly the scapegoats?”In his Sunday Times column, the 34-year-old Derby player/coach added: “For the Premier League to just announce the proposal, as it has done, increases the pressure on players and in my opinion it is now a no-win situation: if players come out and say they can’t agree or are not willing to cut by 30 per cent, even if the real reasons are that it will financially ruin some, it will be presented as ‘rich players refuse pay cut’.“It seemed strange to me because every other decision in this process has been kept behind closed doors, but this had to be announced publicly.“Why? It feels as if it’s to shame the players – to force them into a corner where they have to pick up the bill for lost revenue.”last_img read more

Foster’s Fairplay | School first, country second?

first_imgThat Calabar High School has created for itself an overwhelmingly significant mark in the annals of Jamaica’s track and field is not up for debate. There can be no credible argument to topple or even downsize that opinion. Such a status was attained on the heels of outstanding, world-level achievements by the institution’s products, Sir Arthur Wint and Herb McKenley, both departed, as well as a former sprint world record holder, Dennis Johnson. Recently, the school, backed by a conglomerate of avid supporters, including some nation leaders, acquired a synthetic running track. With it came infrastructure which saw them, at the time of commissioning, the only high school so blessed. This should go a far way to their maintaining a dynasty of Boys’ Champs successes, which is already threatening to mirror that of their arch rivals, Kingston College in the period 1962-1975. It should be noted, too, that sensing this, the North Street school is well on the way to establishing its own. Foster’s Fairplay, which, for a long time, has agonised over the substandard surfaces on which our young athletes have been compelled to train, is celebrating these developments. Driving this good feeling is the thought that not only will the schoolboys benefit, but their elite-level coaches will seize the opportunity of establishing at the enhanced venue senior programmes built around athletes capable of performing with distinction, similar to the three giants mentioned earlier – a major plus for Jamaica. However, there is that proverbial fly in the ointment. Ominous sounds are coming from the Calabar principal that are interpreted as being a locking down of the new track. The words used, in the view of this columnist, establish both intent and guilt. When the question of this action being taken in the middle of the season was raised, the head honcho, Albert Corcho, disagreed. In his view, it was “the end of the season”, which would make the ruling, according to his judgment, a natural one. It is useful to mention that from the same quarter, there was talk of damage being done to the track by the use of oversized spikes. Foster’s Fairplay is not sure how that can be attributed to either party – the school’s track team or the Akan Club – both coached by the highly celebrated Michael Clarke. As such, that argument as to the reason for the boss’s seemingly unrelenting positions should be discounted. Another point, worthy of consideration is that Clarke has chosen silence as his response. To read disgust into that cannot be too far off the mark, and he could be seeking other options to prepare both sets of his athletes. Corcho spoke of plans to reopen the track after repairs, at the same time suggesting that athletes from the school, having finished their duty to Calabar at the so-called “end of the season”, as well as the club team, could go elsewhere to prepare themselves for their international exploits. Therein rests a problem in the opinion of this columnist. In these times of falling standards and the “I” being placed on a higher pedestal than the “we”, school administrators need to exercise due caution. They should not be sending a message that representing your country is of a lower-level status. What are you saying to your students other than, “school first, country second” when you give them all the support for school engagements but abandon them in this “don’t care” manner when they try to take their skills to the national level? Corcho has, undoubtedly, been a contributor to the high-profile Calabar is having in the schoolboy track and field marketplace, so one should view his stance as a transient moment of irrational thinking. He should now do a rethink, and, along with other responsible in-house voices, of which Calabar is not lacking, arrive at a decision that is more supportive of the nation’s cause. The joy and glory of an Olympic or World Championships gold medal by a former “Here, Sir” student, should not escape him. He needs to set the necessary guidelines, but not deny those who attempt to progress to the higher level, the use of the new facility. Send feedback to lauriefoster2012@gmail.com EXERCISE DUE CAUTIONlast_img read more

Columnist should be sanctioned

first_imgDear Editor,Most days I take a glimpse of what Frederick Kissoon says though everything is taken with a grain of salt. I never expected Kissoon would stoop so low and pen that 09-24-17 column, “Context rules life Ms Nicholas-Garrett”.Kissoon has been known to exaggerate, twist and manipulate stories so that he can look good in the right light. (A case in point is his story about Dr Dennis Leblanc’s visit to Guyana. I exposed Kissoon’s lies in my KN letter after engaging with some cursory research about Dr Leblanc. The medical doctor sought me out and thanked me for giving an accurate picture of his mission and perception of Guyana).To a degree, Kissoon is right about his view that “context is everything in life” – especially when it comes to racial sensitivities. Most blacks of the United States, for example, are quite divided on the use of the N-word; a simple Google search will turn up umpteen articles on the subject. Some argue it is okay to use the term – depending on who says it to whom, when, where, tone of voice, and so on; in other words, it depends on the context. Some vehemently argue that it is okay for Blacks and Latinos to use the term whereas it is ‘no-no’ if a white person utters it on their lips.It is downright despicable for Kissoon to defend a senior Government worker, Lloyda Nicholas-Garrett, for her racial tirades –- especially since she works in the Office of the President. The columnist should be sanctioned for that missive since it gives tacit approval for office (or any) worker to cascade racial slurs. Defending racial slurs is unpardonable at its worst and repugnant at its best, for it sends the wrong message to the Guyanese people when they are in the throes of racial insecurities. In a highly charged racial atmosphere as in Guyana, there should be zero tolerance for racial harangues – whether that is directed to fellow workers or to the public. The hallowed Office of the President ought to be the touchstone on how Guyanese should behave towards each other.The incident brings back a memory of an episode that took place in 2003. I was in the process of organising a show for a foreign artiste at the National Cultural Centre (NCC) when I heard one of the staff howling at the top of her voice about “coolie people” and “black people”. These terms in themselves could be very harmless or harmful; it depends on the context of what was spoken. Suffice it to say that that incident was a clear case of the woman spewing her racial rant – directed at me. Her tone of voice, her emphasis, her stares and her anger told the whole story – even though it was the first time we encountered each other.Being a target of racial hatred was bad enough. What really hurt was where and when this hatred was unfurled. It took place at the NCC – which was apparently built by Indian immigration fund money. My blood was boiling at the thought that I was a racial target at an institution where my fore-parents paid with their sweat, blood, and tears to build.Again, it all comes down to context. Some will go to the depths of any sleaze hole to punctuate the frame of reference so that the writer could look good – as in the Dr Leblanc citation. Many are aware that certain columnists will stretch to the abyss, if necessary, so as to retain their fan base. Pity!Sincerely,Devanand BhagwanBrampton, ON, Canadalast_img read more

Wildfire threatens state power lines

first_imgSACRAMENTO – Firefighters raced to beat high winds predicted for today that could drive a wildfire near the Oregon border into the major transmission lines that carry power between California and the Pacific Northwest. The fire, around 70 miles northwest of Redding in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest, is burning between three transmission lines located about 1 miles apart. The fire is paralleling the lines, which together carry about 4,200 megawatts of Bonneville Power Administration electricity to California. Firefighters working through the night Thursday took advantage of cool temperatures and calm winds to contain half the fire burning in the remote area, officials said Friday. The fire was a quarter-mile from the nearest power line, but firefighters feared winds predicted to gust to 30 mph beginning today could drive the fire out of control. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREPhotos: At LA County Jail, Archbishop José H. Gomez celebrates Christmas Mass with inmatesThe California Independent System Operator, which manages the state’s power grid, has contingency plans to reroute electricity around the transmission lines if one or more fail or have to be shut down because of the fire, said Jim Detmers, the system’s vice president for operations. In Southern California, meanwhile, cooler weather brought wildfires to a standstill. “Things are calming down quite a bit,” said Maeton Freel of the U.S. Forest Service.last_img read more

Ryan Stevenson joins Troon after quitting Raith

first_imgTroon chairman Jim Kirkwood said: “When I became aware from my management team that there was the possibility of signing Ryan we tried to move as quickly as possible to make it happen and after discussion with our main sponsor we have been able to strike a deal that suits all parties. “We are delighted to be able to help bring such a big signing to the club.”Troon’s manager Gordon Burns said that recruiting the former Ayr, Partick Thistle and Hearts player would be a benefit for all the players and that the signing was a mark of the club’s ambition.“I am delighted we have recruited someone of Ryan’s calibre, it’s not only good for us but for Junior football as a whole,” he said. Ryan Stevenson has joined Junior side Troon FC less than a month after retiring from professional football.The forward announced he was leaving Raith Rovers and ending a 15-year professional career at the beginning of March, with his final game in the SPFL coming in unusual circumstances.The attacker played in goals in a 1-0 defeat to Ayr United after an injury crisis hit the club.Now, Stevenson has agreed a deal with West of Scotland Super League Premier Division side Troon FC until the end of next season, a signing the club described as “a coup”.  “It’s a tremendous boost for everyone at our level and I’m really looking forward to working with him. “A player of his quality and experience will have a great impact in the dressing room, particularly on our younger players, and will help raise the standards of everything we do.”last_img read more

Breaking News in the Industry: October 10, 2018

first_imgOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAGroup of six snatch $11,000 in designer purses The following information comes from the Northbrook, Illinois, Police Department as a record of incidents reported to the police and those arrested on criminal charges, which represent accusations that are often dropped or reduced. Updated information may be available from the Cook County Clerk of the Circuit Court. Everyone arrested is presumed to be innocent unless found guilty in court beyond a reasonable doubt.Staff at the Northbrook Court Louis Vuitton reported around 3:30 p.m. on October 3 that five men and one woman described as in their early 20’s stole three purses from a display worth about $11,000 before fleeing the area in one foreign type vehicle and another sedan. Police are continuing to investigate. (Last week, four women or girls stole about a dozen purses from another Northbrook store.)     [Source: Northbrook Patch]Apple contracts police to deter thefts at retail storesApple is expanding its efforts to deter thieves from their retail stores in California, as well as beefing up security to prevent further loss. The tech giant has moved to contract local police to provide “tighter security” at its stores. These officers are paid by Apple and are privately contracted, meaning that no tax dollars are at use.- Sponsor – Apple already has security and police guarding its stores across the country, but this new contact is an extension of those efforts in response to safety concerns at California stores. While many malls offer their own security, their power is greatly limited, and once robbers escape the mall, there’s nothing the mall security can do.Thus far, the Sacramento police officers contracted by Apple have helped to put customers at ease, and stores have been robbery free for several weeks, according to CBS Sacramento.   [Source: Security Today]New tech uses product ‘fingerprints’ to detect counterfeitsEntrupy has launched a fingerprinting solution to counteract the growth of counterfeit products, according to a press release. The company’s company’s tech uses computer vision techniques, artificial intelligence and machine learning to verify the authenticity of designer and luxury goods through a fingerprint-like match stored in the cloud.The Entrupy Fingerprinting system, which relies on a mobile app, has been tested by an upscale retail chain in the United Kingdom. The retailer, which Entrupy did not identify, used the system on high-value goods to prevent returns fraud. Verify returns instantly at the point of intake expedites returns and detects if a replica product has been substituted, according to Entrupy.The company said the system has been tested in diverse categories, including apparel, cosmetics, luxury goods, electronics and industrial parts. Brands currently authenticated include Balenciaga, Bottega Veneta, Burberry, Celine, Chanel, Chloé, Coach, Dior, Fendi, Goyard, Gucci, Hermès, Louis Vuitton, Prada and Saint Laurent, according to Entrupy’s website.  [Source: RetailDIVE]Men in bonnets shoplift thousands from lingerie storePolice in Spartanburg, South Carolina, say two men wearing bonnets shoplifted thousands of dollars in merchandise from a Victoria’s Secret store. The incident happened Monday evening at WestGate Mall in Spartanburg, according to a Spartanburg Police Department incident report.The manager of Victoria’s Secret/PINK told officers she was alerted by the machine at the store’s entrance that detects when merchandise is being shoplifted, according to the report. n employee told officers that when she was cleaning up, she saw a man wearing a white shirt, blue jeans and a bonnet on his head, the report states. Another customer saw two men with bonnets on their heads “grab several thousand dollars worth” of merchandise and clothes from the front table in the store and clothing that was hanging up beside the table, police said.There was surveillance footage of the theft; however, the manager told officers it would not be available from corporate until later. The two bonnet-clad suspects were seen running toward and then through Bed, Bath & Beyond, then getting into an SUV outside the store. The police department redacted the total dollar amount of the stolen items in the report.   [Source: The State]Consumers getting refunds from record fraud judgmentThe government has obtained a record $1.3 billion civil court judgment against AMG Services, Inc. and Scott Tucker on charges they operated a massive payday lending scheme. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Department of Justice (DOJ) say $505 million of that amount is being returned to consumers the government says were victims of deception. The defendants were charged with violating both the FTC Act and the Truth in Lending Act.The case goes back to 2012 when the FTC charged the company told borrowers they would only pay a one-time fee plus the loan amount. Instead, the government said AMG made multiple withdrawals from consumers’ bank accounts, charging a new finance fee with each withdrawal. Because of that, consumers who borrowed from AMG paid far more for the loans than they had originally agreed to pay.Last year, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York concluded prosecution of Tucker and his attorney by securing convictions on criminal charges. Tucker was sentenced to 16 years in prison. U.S. Bancorp, the parent company of U.S. Bank, was fined $528 million for violations of the Bank Secrecy Act. Prosecutors said it failed to alert law enforcement to Tucker’s suspicious banking activities.The FTC and DOJ say they are using the money obtained through the civil and criminal cases to make refunds to consumers who took out loans before January 2013 from any AMG company. Recipients should deposit or cash checks within 60 days, as indicated on the check. Consumers should also guard against telephone calls from people claiming to be from the government, seeking information or funds to facilitate payment. That’s an old scam trick.The FTC says it has the companies’ business records and will use them to identify consumers eligible for a refund and will send the check. The FTC never requires consumers to pay money or provide information to cash refund checks.While it is not necessary to contact the FTC, consumers who have questions may call the agency at 866.730.8147.   [Source: Consumer Affairs] Two men shoplift with 3 children, baby carrier in towTwo Illinois men were seen leading three children, a baby carrier and carts of stolen merchandise out of a Walmart. Crime Stoppers of the Quad Cities reports two black men in their mid to late 30s were walking out of a Walmart on Sept. 29 when store security confronted them. The men had three children, all of whom appeared to be younger than four years old. One of the men also had a covered baby carrier on his cart.The men refused to cooperate with store loss prevention, according to the report. One men pulled the children into a 2018 Toyota Camry rental car by the arms. The other “tossed the carrier in the back seat.” None of the children were secured. They then left the store. The baby carrier was covered, but LP said they think baby clothes were stashed under the cover. The report says anyone with information can submit a tip anonymously by calling Crime Stoppers at 309.762.9500 or submitting a Web Tip. Tippers could receive up to $1,000 in rewards.   [Source: WQAD8 News] Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

Commercetools’ Kelly Goetsch: Think ‘spokes,’ not ‘hubs’

first_img Posted on 15th September 2018Digital Marketing FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+share Commercetools’ Kelly Goetsch: Think ‘spokes,’ not ‘hubs’You are here: HomeDigital MarketingCommercetools’ Kelly Goetsch: Think ‘spokes,’ not ‘hubs’ Go headless and best of breed.That’s the key advice from Commercetools chief product officer Kelly Goetsch for large enterprises looking to expand their e-commerce. (He will dive deeper into this topic in his presentation on “How IT and marketing can use microservices to peacefully co-exist and serve the needs of customers” at our MarTech Conference next month in Boston.)Founded in 2013, Commercetools provides function-specific cloud-based mini-applications that operate with the help of about 300 APIs. If you want to add a function to check inventory before making a sale, add that component. If you want a new kind of checkout, add that one.This best of breed “Lego bricks” approach works well for e-commerce, Goetsch told me, because selling products is a series of discrete steps that a brand might want to customize for its unique approach.[Read the full article on MarTech Today.]The post Commercetools’ Kelly Goetsch: Think ‘spokes,’ not ‘hubs’ appeared first on Marketing Land.From our sponsors: Commercetools’ Kelly Goetsch: Think ‘spokes,’ not ‘hubs’ Related postsThe California Consumer Privacy Act goes live in a few short weeks — Are you ready?14th December 2019Lytics now integrates with Google Marketing Platform to enable customer data-informed campaigns14th December 2019ML 2019121313th December 2019Global email benchmark report finds email isn’t dead – it’s essential13th December 20192019 benchmark report: brand vs. non-brand traffic in Google Shopping12th December 2019Keep your LinkedIn advertising strategy focused in 202012th December 2019last_img read more

Scientific Council Ruckus Continues

first_imgThe war of words surrounding the cuts announced last month by the United Kingdom’s Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) continues to rumble on with various groups writing to the science minister and much debate on blogs. The council is responsible for a number of domestic and overseas facilities, subscriptions to major international collaborations such as CERN and the European Southern Observatory, as well as funding researchers in astronomy, particle physics, nuclear physics, and space science. The STFC’s budget hole was caused by overcommitment in the past, the declining value of the pound, and the expectation of flat funding from the government. Funding to a large number of projects will be axed as well as a 10% cut in grants and a 25% cut in studentships and fellowships. Nuclear physics was hardest hit. Now the five professors who headed the subject panels that prioritized all the projects have written an open letter to science minister Paul Drayson registering their “dismay” at the outcome. Last week, the STFC’s director of science programs, John Womersley, defended the cuts, followed this week by a blistering critique from Brian Cox, a particle physicist from the University of Manchester. Before Christmas, Drayson also received missives from 20 members of the UK Nuclear Physics Heads of Groups Committee, and from Nuclear Physics European Collaboration Committee, signed by 28 prominent European chemists. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Workshop on ethics of monkey research earns cheers and boos

first_imgThe path to the workshop began in 2014, when PETA blanketed Washington, D.C., with ads alleging that researchers at an NIH lab in Poolesville, Maryland, were subjecting rhesus macaques to cruel experiments by removing them from their mothers at birth and addicting them to alcohol. In response, four members of Congress requested that NIH investigate the lab. In 2015, the agency announced that it had found no major issues, but it decided to phase out the experiments, blaming funding rather than animal rights pressure. At the same time, Congress included language in a 2016 spending bill that asked NIH to “conduct a review of its ethical policies and processes with respect to nonhuman primate research subjects, in consultation with outside experts, to ensure it has appropriate justification for animal research protocols.”That request became yesterday’s workshop. NIH Director Francis Collins kicked off the proceedings, calling it a “very important day” and stating that nonhuman primates “have proven to be exceptionally valuable in biomedical research.” But he also said that the welfare of these animals—more than 100,000 of which currently reside in U.S. labs—was critical. “We need to respect all of the species that contribute so much to our understanding of human health and disease.”A series of speakers then extolled the advances made possible by research involving laboratory monkeys. Nancy Haigwood, director of the Oregon National Primate Research Center in Beaverton, said that some of today’s most powerful HIV drugs, including AZT and tenofovir, were first tested in rhesus macaques, and that the animals will play a critical role in fighting emerging infectious diseases such as Zika and Ebola. “Nonhuman primates will be essential to having a rapid response.”Michael Platt, a neuroscientist at the University of Pennsylvania, said that because macaques live in social groups like we do, researchers can use them to study disorders like autism. His lab has found that giving the “trust hormone” oxytocin to monkeys improves their social interactions. “They basically use the same neural circuits we do,” he said.Other speakers described their work utilizing monkeys to improve assisted fertility techniques in humans and of stimulating monkey brains with electrodes to study the basis of vision. “Animal models are critical to our scientific understanding of the nervous system,” said William Newsome, a neuroscientist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. “Tissue culture does not get depression, Parkinson’s, or Alzheimer’s.”A discussion session that followed was largely dedicated to how researchers can better share their data and whether they should publicize negative results. Still, Larry Carbone, the interim director of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Program at the University of California, San Francisco, brought up some of the first welfare issues in the workshop by stating that lab primates should be housed in more natural environments—with dirt, big spaces, and large social groups—like those seen in some national primate centers. Some attendees agreed, though others said that labs offered more controlled environments.Charles Murry, a pathologist at the University of Washington, Seattle, whose lab uses stem cells to repair induced heart damage in macaques, added that scientists need to do a better job of convincing the public of the importance of animal research. “Our press people tell us not to mention the word ‘monkey,’” he said. “We should be doing more than trying to keep a low profile. That’s the path to the extinction of the whole program.”Ethical issues came more into play in the afternoon. In a session on research oversight, NIH and U.S. Department of Agriculture representatives reiterated that researchers working with nonhuman primates must justify their work and do their best to minimize pain and distress. Other panelists spoke of how to take better care of lab monkeys and how to avoid duplicating research that has already been done.The only real sparks flew during a follow-up discussion session, when Tom Beauchamp, an ethicist at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., brought up laboratory chimpanzees. In 2011, a U.S. National Academy of Medicine report found that—for scientific and ethical reasons—most research on chimps was unnecessary, a move that eventually led NIH to end all of its support for invasive chimpanzee research. Similar issues now confront the use of other nonhuman primates, Beauchamp said. “A lot of people here have been saying that scientific necessity is the key issue. … That’s just the first step. There has to be moral justification as well.”Jeffrey Kahn, a bioethicist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, and the chair of the chimpanzee report, added that nonhuman primate research should only be conducted if it has to be conducted. “It’s not ethically acceptable to do research that is not necessary. Being ‘necessary’ is not the same as ‘worth doing.’”That led to a debate about just what constituted “necessary” and “moral justification.” Even research that doesn’t have an immediate translation to people—like figuring out how the monkey brain works—is necessary, argued Newsome, because it could eventually lead to significant new knowledge that might improve human health. “It will be a tragedy for the world if we don’t leave room for basic science.” Most attendees seemed to agree, with some stating that not doing research on monkeys was ethically indefensible because humans would suffer down the line.Despite that ethical debate, animal welfare groups said they were upset that science—not welfare—dominated the workshop. Of the 13 speakers, eight make their living working with nonhuman primates. The workshop also only devoted 2 minutes—instead of its scheduled 30 minutes—to public comments. “We are extremely disappointed that no animal protection groups were invited,” wrote Kathleen Conlee, vice president of animal research issues for The Humane Society of the United States in Washington, D.C., in an email to ScienceInsider. “It is clear that NIH has not followed through on what Congress requested, which was to examine ethical policies and processes.”Allyson Bennett in Madison, a spokesperson for Speaking of Research, an international organization that supports the use of animals in scientific labs, says that there was more discussion of ethics than it appeared on the surface. “Ethical considerations are embedded in institutional review and federal oversight,” she says, noting that no work on nonhuman primates can be funded or take place unless it meets strict welfare guidelines. “The workshop absolutely fulfilled its mandate.” Ethics, she says, go beyond animal welfare. “The public is interested in new knowledge and medical progress. That’s a key piece of the ethical justification for this work.”Correction, 9 September 2016, 10:06 a.m.: The photo caption originally identified the monkeys as being located in Bastrop, Texas. They were in fact at an NIH lab. Depending on whom you ask, yesterday’s U.S. government workshop on the state of nonhuman primate research was either a raging success or a complete fiasco. The event, held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, brought together dozens of scientists, veterinarians, and bioethicists to discuss how research on monkeys and related animals is contributing to human medicine and to review the welfare policies that surround this work. But observers differed widely on whether it accomplished what Congress had in mind when it told NIH to hold the event.“It was a great showcase of the importance nonhuman primates have played and continue to play in human health,” says Anne Deschamps, a senior science policy analyst at the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology in Bethesda, one of several scientific organizations that signed onto a white paper released in advance of the meeting that promoted the use of these animals in biomedical research. She contends that research on these animals has been critical for our understanding of HIV and the human brain.But the animal rights group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), whose lobbying efforts led to the workshop, says the meeting was supposed to determine whether monkeys and their relatives belong in laboratories in the first place. “It was an infomercial for the use of monkeys in experiments,” says PETA Senior Vice President Kathy Guillermo in Norfolk, Virginia. “It was a wasted opportunity.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Young European eels may use magnetic fields to guide them home

first_img Eels make remarkable migrations. Adults from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean swim to the Sargasso Sea to reproduce, and their offspring take a few years to return the 6000 kilometers to their respective coastlines. How they get there has been an enduring mystery. Many biologists have assumed these newborns drift aimlessly until swept up into the Gulf Stream, but like a few other marine creatures, they may actually use Earth’s magnetic field to guide their course, marine biologists have now discovered.Some researchers question whether this sixth sense exists in the very youngest eels found in the Sargasso Sea, but if it does, “this study adds to the growing body of evidence that the magnetic sense may be an important component of fishes that make long migrations in the ocean,” says Michael Miller, an eel biologist at Nihon University in Fujisawa, Japan, who was not involved in the work. And if it holds up that newborn eels do more than drift aimlessly, the study paints a new picture: These young eels “may be the ultimate swimming machines,” he adds.Over the years, researchers have found that a magnetic sixth sense exists, perhaps even in people, and is important in salmon, sea turtle, and trout migrations. And some work indicates that adult eels also sense magnetic fields. But proving the same was true of juvenile eels was quite tricky, as these fish can be quite erratic in their behavior. That makes it hard to discern any patterns in their orientation, and thus they are difficult to test.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)To better quantify whether eels did tend to swim in a particular direction in response to a magnetic field, Lewis Naisbett-Jones, a marine biologist at University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, and Nathan Putman, a marine biologist from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory at the University of Miami in Florida, designed a 25-centimeter-wide underwater arena: a central chamber connected to a dozen outer sections, each representing 30° on a compass. They tested so-called glass eels, which is what the juvenile eels transform into when they arrive in Europe. A movable wall kept the eel in the center until the magnetic field was turned on and testing began.The researchers simulated magnetic fields from different parts of the migration route, and the fish responded as if they knew where they were going. In the magnetic field that was the same as in the Sargasso Sea, most of the eels headed southwest, showing they did head in a particular direction in response to the magnetic field. In the test using the magnetic field found in the Atlantic off North America, the eels turned northeast, showing that slightly different magnetic fields caused them to orient in a different way, the researchers report today in Current Biology.“We were not surprised to find eels have a magnetic map, but we were surprised to discover how well they can detect subtle differences in magnetic fields” Naisbett-Jones says.At first, the orientations were confusing—the eels weren’t headed the most direct way home. Yet a computer model showed that the headings taken by the juvenile eels in the experiment would in fact make their migration more efficient, as they got the fish into the Gulf Stream faster and kept them in this current so that they headed to Europe.“Swimming the ‘wrong’ direction for a bit gets them into the Antilles Current, which connects them to the Gulf Stream,” Putman explains. “So, with a little bit of work they can get a mostly free ride to Europe.”The oceanographic model “strengthens the overall findings,” says Miguel Baltazar-Soares, a marine biologist at Bournemouth University in Poole, U.K., who was not involved with the work.However, the study has a major flaw, several experts say. Eels undergo several major transformations. Newborns are not very eellike at all, being more like flattened gelatinous ribbons than rounded elongated fish, so it’s not clear that these newborns would have the same sensory capabilities of the juveniles tested, says Caroline Durif, a marine biologist at the Institute of Marine Research in Bergen, Norway. “I would also like to point out that none of the authors are recognized eel experts—the paper’s main authors have not focused on eels before in their research. Otherwise, they would have realized how absurd this study is.”But Putman doesn’t think the use of older eels is a problem and assumes even newborns have this magnetic sense. Instead, he thinks that the novelty of finding a magnetic compass in eels “might rub some people the wrong way” because they had not discovered it before.Next, he hopes to demonstrate that adult eels also use magnetism to find their way to the Sargasso Sea. Lewis Naisbett-Jones Young European eels may use magnetic fields to guide them home These 2-year-old eels sense and respond to magnetic fields, but the question remains whether newborn eels do as well. By Elizabeth PennisiApr. 13, 2017 , 12:00 PMlast_img read more